65

You can use ExitNodes in your torrc to set a country code, but it wouldn't be the best solution to your request. Streaming Netflix over Tor would be incredibly slow and actually have a fairly negative effect on the network just to let you watch a few extra TV shows. Your best option would probably be to set up a VPN in the country of your choosing. This ...


19

The following excerpts from the Tor Project Manual should tell you everything you need to know: ExitNodes node,node,… A list of identity fingerprints, nicknames, country codes and address patterns of nodes to use as exit node---that is, a node that delivers traffic for you outside the Tor network. Note that if you list too few nodes here, or ...


12

Usually it implies that they are breaking stuff, either maliciously or through misconfiguration. The most common misconfiguration I have seen is using OpenDNS as a host's nameserver with what I think is the OpenDNS default configuration. Services such as OpenDNS lie to you, under the name of protecting you. The result is for instance getting redirected to ...


11

This community wiki will list commonly used websites known to be troublesome for Tor users. These will be broken down into the following categories: Blocked Access to Tor traffic completely blocked Limited by CAPTCHA Access may require submitting a CAPTCHA or similar verification Otherwise Limited Access is limited in some other way, e.g. certain ...


11

Look for Data/Tor/torrc file inside your Tor Browser Bundle directory. Add the following line to your torrc file: ExitNodes {us} That's all.


10

There's actually been an explosion of non-profits lately that are organized for running exit relays. In rough order of appearance on the scene: Zwiebelfreunde, aka torservers.net, is the original organization formed for this purpose, and they still operate the most capacity in the Tor network (Germany). The Swiss Privacy Foundation has been running Tor ...


10

The geographical information comes from a so-called geoip file. This file has a mapping from IP address to country. This file (or database) is provided by Maxmind, a company that deals with such information. The Tor Project cleans up and converts this file and ships it with every Tor client. This company can forge its data to give you a wrong impression. ...


9

Is the client able to detect a malicious bevaviour from an exit node? Not really. If a malicious exit relay operator conducts a man-in-the-middle (MitM) attack by using a self-signed certificate, TorBrowser will display a certificate error page. That's what everybody already knows from an ordinary Firefox. Right now, there is no easy way to distinguish ...


9

Nodes in circuits are chosen randomly. (Selection is weighted by a way-too-complex function of capacity, roles, etc, but it's still a random selection.) Sometimes, two random choices will actually be the same, just like sometimes a coin toss will indeed be heads-up twice in a row. That means that every once in a while a new circuit will exit from the same ...


9

To add to the other reasons of why this is a bad idea, there are also legal issues with monitoring or modifying traffic going through your exit node. From the Tor legal FAQ: Should I snoop on the plaintext traffic that exits through my Tor relay? No. You may be technically capable of modifying the Tor source code or installing additional software to ...


8

Having only a thousand exit relays does not harm your anonymity directly. If there were only a thousand users, then that would be a problem. But there aren't. There are many thousands of users, and you get your anonymity from blending in with them. Or, in other words, you derive anonymity because nobody can tell you from the hundreds of thousands of ...


8

The short answer is: You shouldn't do it! Do not mess with user data. A large portion of Tor users use it to stay anonymous and they would be very upset when someone messes with their traffic. It is quite hard to decide what spam, malware etc. from the perspective of each user is. So a general filter doesn't fit all your users. If you want to let your ...


8

All Tor circuits contain 3 nodes by default (passing over hidden services which work a little differently and essentially use two circuits chained to a gateway node). Any more than this does not add any extra anonymity. While it is possible to change the number of nodes by modifying the source code, this is not recommended. Any less than three nodes and ...


7

You can use ExoneraTor, a tool by Tor Project designed for that work. Of course you should also contact a lawyer with some affinity on Internet laws so as to handle better your case. If you're located in USA you could contact EFF, a non-profit which actively and legally supports digital rights. If you're in Europe, people of Torservers could give you some ...


7

The Tor community maintains a list of ISPs that have worked for others in the past along with some comments of people's experiencs working with each service. That list is here: https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/GoodBadISPs The Bitcoin wiki maintains a list of VPS providers that accept payment in Bticoin. This does not mean that they are ...


7

Tor does not have a concept of exit nodes that only you can use. The routing protocol allows for it, but there is no support in Tor or its directory layer for what you ask.


6

During the time when you encountered this fluctuation Tor had some problems with a botnet. Some ukrainian guy deployed Tor nodes and they build cuircits. As there were quite a huge amount of clients, this put a fair share of load on the relays. Maybe your relay also was affected. This fluctuation should have disappeared because tried to remove the malware.


6

I do not believe there are any other methods you could use that wouldn't ultimately harm the Tor network in some way. Limiting the Bandwidth, and setting an Exit Policy are the only tools that Tor provides to configure your exit. Any other policy would have to either Use some form of traffic inspection, to determine if the traffic is "malicious", for ...


6

Your running Tor will cache the descriptors of other relays in a file called "cached-descriptors". The descriptors include the exit policies for the relays. This file will be located in the Tor data directory. The data directory may be specified in your torrc using the DataDirectory keyword. The location is by default within the TBB itself for Tor ...


6

Your connection into the Tor network itself is encrypted, as are connections between Tor nodes. In fact, each hop is encrypted with a new key to avoid back-tracing. What might be unencrypted is the connection from your Exit Node onto the web, if you're connecting over an unencrypted protocol. This means that if you're viewing a standard HTTP webpage then ...


6

Advertised bandwidth as reported by atlas and globe is really what is observed as of far. Your relay has only been up for four days, and as your relay proves its reliability and speed, advertised bandwidth will go up. https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-relays/2014-June/004711.html


6

When running an exit node, it is highly recommended to make it as clear as possible that it is an exit node. This helps the operator deal with DMCA notifications and abuse reports and the like. Further more, it is impossible for any relay, exit or non-exit, to hide the fact that they are a relay. The list of all relays and their flags is publicly available....


6

According to that website there is 1096 exit-nodes in the network. The graphs on Tor Metrics seem to suggest a similar number, maybe ~1300. Exit nodes are the relays that forward your traffic to whatever servers you're trying to talk to, so they're the ones that give you your IP address. Therefore there's about 1096 or 1300 different IP addresses that you ...


5

I don't think the Tor client itself can detect malicious behaviour carried out by an exit node nor should it. If you're browsing a site over http:// then as you say, the exit node can view and manipulate your traffic like any MiTM could. The solution is TLS but as you pointed out there are MiTM attacks that can be launched against sites using TLS such as ...


5

The ip of the exit relay does not say anything about your identity. The whole circuit is replaced, not (just) the exit relay, so it shouldn't matter if you end up on the same exit node. As for theTorbutton vs Vidalia new identity, the Torbutton additionally clears out your browser's session cookies, cache, history, etc and closes open tabs. Vidalia just ...


5

I recommend building one of your own rather than sharing one. You can run a non-logging DNS service (a recursive caching resolver) on the same system as the Tor node, or on another system netwise nearby. This can provide good safety and performance. As you note, other DNS services can and often will log DNS queries, engage in typo-squating/hijacking, or be ...


5

In addition to ExitNodes {us} and StrictNodes 1, you should also use DNSPort 5553, along with dnsmasq (this is a dns relay program) with --server=/geoblocked.url/127.0.0.1#5553 Then use Tor for ONLY the DNS lookups, since this is the only part that is actually geoblocked.


5

No. Tor traffic does not necessarily all exit at the same exit node. For each socket connection that the client sets up, a circuit is used that ends in an appropriate exit node. That is an exit node that allows the IP and port the client is trying to reach.


5

The path spec doesn't list choosing your own node as one of its constraints on exit nodes: 2.2. Path selection and constraints We choose the path for each new circuit before we build it. We choose the exit node first, followed by the other nodes in the circuit. All paths we generate obey the following constraints: We do not choose ...


5

As far as I know, 'relaying for hidden services' is not optional. If you're a relay, you can be used to access hidden services. However, being part of a circuit from a client to a HS is no different than being part of a circuit from a client to an exit and subsequently to the clear net. (If anything, there is less risk, since you're not necessarily ...


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