5

A directory mirror that has an max accounting set is simply not best practice. So a directory mirror has to be reliable and always on to be useful. Another reason is that if you set an AccountingMax it is much more important to use the limited amount of traffic for incoming client connections than using it for syncing between dirauths and your relay. So it ...


5

It's running in the background. For console output, add | more to the end. Like this: tor --hash-password "Password" | more I recommend new users to go with Vidalia from here


4

These are search engines that index .onion sites: Torch not Evil Candle ahmia.fi


4

I'll give it a try: BandwidthBurst: The maximum bandwidth of short spikes in network traffic. While Tor tries to use BandwidthRate on average, it may use this value for short bursts. It was advised that this value should be four times the BandwidthRate. BandwidthRate: The average bandwidth Tor should use. RelayBandwidthBurst and RelayBandwidthRate: Both ...


4

Near the top of this page: Consensus Health, in the Signatures section, you will find a 'consensus' (and 'vote') link for each Directory Authority. These link directly to http://ip.of.the.relay:dirport/tor/status-vote/current/consensus.


4

Check out: https://collector.torproject.org/archive/relay-descriptors/consensuses/ and the main page (https://collector.torproject.org/) for more info.


3

You can easily fetch the consensus with... https://stem.torproject.org/api/descriptor/remote.html https://stem.torproject.org/tutorials/mirror_mirror_on_the_wall.html For an example of a script that compares a couple authorities see... https://stem.torproject.org/tutorials/examples/compare_flags.html That said, please don't hit the authorities every five ...


3

directory server periodically uploads the list of nodes that are available for relaying data. client selects three nodes from this list and gets their public key using which it encrypt data multiple times and sends data to first node of the circuit. each node in the circuit decrypts one layer using their private key. and exit node send data to the ...


3

As far as I see it the answer is in the source code. ;-) The file main.c has a function run_scheduled_events. The comment to this function says: Perform regular maintenance tasks. This function gets run once per second by second_elapsed_callback(). Within the source code there is a list of things which this function does. As far as I see it item 2c ...


3

Have a look at how Tails does time syncing via the Tor consensus file. You can also use Jacob Applebaum's tlsdate over Tor.


3

There are 9 directory authorities which are hard-coded into the Tor software. Following please find addresses and some additional information about these directory authorites: https://atlas.torproject.org/#search/flag:authority


3

By definition bridge relays are Tor relays that aren't listed in the main Tor directory. So if you set: BridgeRelay 1 PublishServerDescriptor 0 this will cause your relay to not publish anywhere. This could be useful for private bridges. If you set: BridgeRelay 1 PublishServerDescriptor bridge your relay descriptor will be publised to the bridge ...


3

There is a tor.exe file in your zip file. Clicking on it may seem to do nothing, but actually it will run under a hidden window. This is a known bug. See this answer for a workaround.


3

What is the maximum number of hidden services DHT (Distributed Hash Table) can hold? Theoretically, the whole hash space. Who maintains the directory? All HSDir relays. What stops anyone from creating a huge list of hidden services (onion addresses) that don't really exist? Nothing. However, HSDirs are still protected from this kind of DoS. Hidden ...


3

This is not what is actually happening. When a Tor client first starts, it does connect to the central Tor servers (Directory Authorities, they're called), but it gets the list of all Tor relays including their keys, not just a few of them. This list is signed by a majority of the Directory Authorities, so any attacker has to compromise (via technical or ...


3

To be a directory server, it is merely a configuration change in your TORRC. Anyone can be or advertise that you are a directory server but none of the clients would trust it. The source code for Tor is available here: https://gitweb.torproject.org/tor.git/


3

Found it.tor creates a directory .tor in the home directory (on Linux). $ ls ~/.tor cached-certs cached-microdesc-consensus cached-microdescs cached-microdescs.new lock state $ grep -Rn 193.11.114.46 cached-microdesc-consensus:24929:r mdfnet3 uD3BVY8NNDU7uZLvk6/q/bImpz4 2015-12-26 11:02:15 193.11.114.46 9003 9032 The directory authorities above are ...


3

The desktop file doesn't work in any case. However Tor comes with a shell script. You can execute it and Tor Browser will start. It is located in the Browser/ subdirectory: tor-browser_en-US/Browser/start-tor-browser


3

What prevents a directory server from being dishonest and give malicious data to the user? The information served by the directories is generated by reaching a consensus between the authorities. You would have to control the majority of the authorities to manipulate the consensus. This should be fairly hard as they are neither under the control of one ...


2

You should get the V2Dir flag simply by publishing a DirPort. Now, whether or not you publish a directory port depends on many factors, including your accounting/hibernation configuration --- see router.c.


2

As the digest of the descriptor is done the same way the fingerprint is calculated both have a binary length of 20 bytes (40 bytes in hex notation). So the same limit applies for the descriptor digest.


2

No it does not. (..and neither does the OR traffic.) The idea that 'traffic counts towards consensus weight' is not how it works. As I understand (from the linked document), the bandwidth is measured by building a circuit through the relay and transferring a file through it (and measuring how long that takes). So the consensus weight is not determined any ...


2

From what I gathered, I have not found anything that point that a client periodically fetch the consensus file. On the other hand, consensus files do expire, and when that happens the client will request the latest version. If you set TestingTorNetwork in torrc to 1, one of the properties tested will be the frequency of fetching the consensus file. The ...


2

No One stores the keys of the Onion Routers making the Virtual Circuit except the Tor Client. The Tor Client download the list of Onion Routers online. It creates the virtual circuit incrementally by selecting three nodes out of that list. What I mean by incrementally here is that it selects one node and gets its public key and use this key to contact ...


2

The difference is because Tonga is a little special. Unlike the other directory authorities Tonga doesn't vote in the consensus (iirc it's the bridge authority). Take a peek at the following list... https://gitweb.torproject.org/stem.git/tree/stem/descriptor/remote.py#n674 Note that Tonga doesn't have a v3ident. Tonga is an authority, but doesn't vote so ...


2

A restart does not cause a relay to lose its Guard and HSDir flags. However, a restart that takes way too long, or frequent restarts (more than one per week, say) can cause a relay to lose its stable flag, which will then cause it to lose its Guard and HSDir flags. Note: OS updates typically do not require restarting. Typically kernel updates are the only ...


2

I assume that you downloaded a valid copy of Tor or Tor Browser. The source code contains information about all current directory authorities. (config.c). Currently there are nine authorities which you can also find within Atlas. This file contains an IP address as well as the fingerprint of the authorities. When the client connects to the authorities it ...


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