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6

Advertised bandwidth as reported by atlas and globe is really what is observed as of far. Your relay has only been up for four days, and as your relay proves its reliability and speed, advertised bandwidth will go up. https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-relays/2014-June/004711.html


5

Probably related to this bug on the torproject bugtracker: #10486 Onionoo is down. Onionoo is the backend service that Atlas queries to get information about the Tor network.


4

With Atlas you can use the search term country:at to see only relays from Austria. However if there are more than 40 results Atlas won't show you any results. So you need to refine your search. Example: Search for Austrian relays with the additional term ab. Globe also allows you to look for a specific country. There is a scroll-down list on top of the page....


4

With Atlas, you are seeing consensus information from the Tor network, as retrieved via Onionoo. It is based on reports to and measurements by Tor network authority servers. It is a periodic report, and does not necessarily reflect the instantaneous state of your relay (recent changes you've made will take a while to show). This is the kind of information ...


3

In your torrc, there are 2 keys that determine your advertised relay bandwidth: RelayBandwidthRate - Sets/limits how much bandwidth you allow for relaying. MaxAdvertisedBandwidth - May not be higher than RelayBandwidthRate. If you don't have this entry, then your RelayBandwidthRate is advertised.


3

From the Tor Project description: Atlas is a web application to discover Tor relays and bridges. It provides useful information on how relays are configured along with graphics about their past usage. This is the spiritual successor to TorStatus, the original codebase for which was written in PHP, and rewritten by students from Wesleyan as ...


2

Click the link that says Atlas below your exit IP. This will open up the Atlas details page for that relay.


2

Information about relays is generally archived permanently. Atlas should show the relay as offline, but the archives will continue to be available.


2

Tor recently switched to providing bandwidth history in 4-hour intervals rather than 15-minute intervals. This caused a lot of the bandwidth displaying tools to have issues with displaying the histories. These issues should be raised on Tor's bug tracker for the individual components if they haven't been mentioned there already so they can be fixed ...


1

It will eventually dissapear on its own. There is nothing you did wrong, and nothing else you can do to remove it on your own.


1

Same with Globe. I'm getting the same things as you since last night at around 8 PM CST. Appears to be a problem with the main Tor website. Just give it a few hours. I'm sure they are working on it already. :)


1

Is your relay a new relay or a relatively new one? If yes, that behavior is normal. New relays need few days before they start functioning as real relays. For more details about a relay lifecycle, this article is an excellent read.


1

Yup, please see the following ticket... https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/ticket/13905


1

Atlas reports that 96.47.226.20 is bolobolo1, and lists its country as the United States. However, What Is My IP Address? lists its country as "Anonymous Proxy". So does MaxMind. PHS probably relies on MaxMind, and definately not on Atlas.


1

You don't necessarily do any thing wrong. The IP 96.47.226.20 is the exit relay bolobolo1 which belongs to TorServers.net. Furthermore the country listing says United States. So everything seems right. However it might be the case that NPR uses a geolocation database with old/wrong data. Here it helps to wait until your circuit changes and you use another ...


1

These log entries are just for notification (Loglevel notice) and provide general information. Tor writes these lines also when it is configured as client. They just tell you that Tor lives and transmitted some data. If you don't want these log lines go to your torrc and look for lines starting with Log notice. Comment them out and restart your Tor process. ...


1

Atlas had some problem in the last days. It seems that the backend onionoo was not working properly. This also affected Globe. It works properly now. So you should check if still you get the message from Atlas. Another possibility to check if an IP address was a Tor relay is Exonerator. Just enter the address and a date and it will tell you if it was an ...


1

One way to look at Atlas page is: Click Test Tor Network Settings from about:tor page. Click Atlas at the middle of check.torproject.org page and make sure you allow script before initiation of step 2.


1

This problem is actively discussed in the bug report #10499. It seems there is a bug in TorDNSEL. It might be a good idea to follow the report. So you get updates on the issue. I'll also try to update to answer if there is a solution.


1

You can lookup a relay by its IP address: https://atlas.torproject.org/#search/82.72.118.90 Edit: How can I glean the fp from TBB 3.5? The fingerprint of which relay? The relay linked on the Tor page is the exit you used to get to the Tor page. All your connections may not use the same exit node, and until you make a circuit, you have no exit node. ...


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