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5

The rules for selecting nodes can be found in the path-spec. Specifically in §2.2 Path selection and constraints. A few points from the section: We do not choose the same router twice for the same path. We do not choose any router in the same family as another in the same path. (Two routers are in the same family if each one lists the other in ...


3

No, and it will never be implemented: it would break the whole relay idea of Tor. Every relay - regardless of it's further roles - is a "regular node", i.e. the middle one. If it's allowed to go outside - then it also/additionally receives an Exit flag. If it's stable and not flapping - it receives a Stable flag, if it's stable-flagged and has a decent ...


3

Vidalia is no longer officially supported. I believe that any remaining references to Vidalia are accidental or historical. If you want to run a relay on Windows, just download the latest tor browser bundle. The bundle includes the latest stable version of tor. Edit your torrc (local inside the downloaded bundle directory) as you normally would to set ...


3

Even if you got this to work, it wouldn't benefit the Tor network. Proxies tend to be slow and unreliable, so your relay would be as well. Also, a Tor relay wouldn't go unnoticed for very long. Few students are online 24/7, as the relay (with luck) would be. And given your comment about the admin, you would soon be in trouble. You could use your own ...


3

If you're using a version of TBB without Vidalia and don't want to install Arm or other control software you can get this information directly from the control port. First you'll want to get the authentication string to use from the auth cookie (this is where it's stored in the TBB, if you've got Tor installed on your system some other way you'll have to use ...


3

This information have traditionally been available in Vidalia, the graphical controller that used to come with TBB (Tor Browser Bundle). Since TBB 3, Vidalia have however been replaced with Tor Launcher, the latter which still is missing information about which Tor nodes are being used. What you instead need to do until this functionality is implemented in ...


3

You can use arm for this purpose. arm is a command line program and it shows several information about the current running Tor instance. When you use the Tor Browser Bundle 3.5 you should enter the following command: arm -i 127.0.0.1:9151 The TBB uses port 9151 by default. When the program has started you'll see an overview of the bandwidth usage. The ...


2

As Peter already said it is not supported and I think it would hurt anonymity and performance. If Tor would keep track of the exits it used and discards them as exits for later circuits it will run out of exits to use. This narrows down where you will exit. If an attacker, who has guards and exits, could make Tor create new circuits he will be able to ...


2

No, Tor has no direct support for tracking which middle or exit nodes you use. It'd probably be a bad idea anyway.


2

As you are not setting up a directory authority, V3AuthoritativeDirectory V3AuthVotingInterval should not be set. Tor will not put load on your disk. It will use bandwidth, CPU and memory. Disk usage is marginal in any cases. For the rest, I suggest looking at the documentation on how to setup a high speed relay on Torservers.net wiki.


2

In general it is better to have a maximum bandwidth for the users. Tor needs some time until it reaches the maximum bandwidth and this will probably take longer than a day. So it is better to set a monthly limit.


2

Any reference to Vidalia that you can still find is a mistake, please either fix it by editing the Wiki or file a bug on the bug Tracker.


1

Your guard node and especially your exit node have a lot of power. The guard node knows who you are, or at least some basic information about you such as your IP. The exit node sees all your DNS queries, where your traffic is going, and can monitor all unencrypted traffic. Because of this, it's important there's an attempt to separate the guard node from the ...


1

It's impossible for the middle to know you were visiting GMail. It didn't go rouge. It's likely Google uses a different GeoIP database than Tor Browser. When Google saw an exit that's allegedly in France, Tor Browser might be thinking the exit is allegedly in Germany. Just as an example. It was you that triggered the alert because you're coming from the ...


1

Monthly limit would be best. Daily limit would cause it to hibernate more frequently, resulting in more disrupted circuits for users, when your relay shuts down or is unexpectedly no longer in the consensus. A monthly limit would mean that such interuption only happens once per month, not every day.


1

All relays are suitable for all positions in ciruits. How clients use them depends on their assigned flags, with the exception of exiting traffic which is defined by their chosen exit policies. So you will potentially act to some users as a guard and others as an intermediary (not always just the "middle") and possibly an exit to others (if you have a ...


1

in the directions on their site they tell you to click the link on this page (https://cloud.torproject.org/#get_started) to the correct AMI images (us-east-1-virginia)... this is a ubuntu with the tor config stuff already to go (Tor-Cloud-EC2--us-east-1-04-13-2013-20616 - ami-4a7c1a23) as far as your last question it is not so much on trust or encryption ...


1

First of all: As far as i know, if you do not compromise the Entry-Relay (Guard), you can not locate the client. So being said, the third case does not result in client de-anonymization. For the other two cases, in which you have compromiesed the entry-relay, you will be able to loacte the client. To be a little more specific: Before there were Entry-...


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