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21

The issue The packages we build for deb.tpo are compiled for various Debian and Ubuntu architectures. These currently are amd64, i386 (x86-64 and x86), and two arm ports: armel and armhf. Arm CPUs come in different versions, and newer versions generally have more features. The arm ports of Debian differ in what kind of CPU they need as a minimum. In ...


8

In regard to the server requirements, there are a few important differences between a hidden FTP service and a regular FTP service. Also, you should check your ftp server software to make sure it doesn't leak your IP address. Force the client to use passive mode, not active/port mode. In passive mode the client initiates both the control and the data ...


5

As far as I see it, the package file brings its own version of the Tor Browser Bundle. So if you want to make sure that someone didn't change anything you'd have to check the integrity for yourself. If you don't do this the maintainer can inject arbitrary code into his TBB version. A better way would be to download the TBB archive directly from torproject....


5

No, there is no snapshot service for deb.tpo. archive.tpo has some old .debs but it is not updated regularly, and thus not current. All source versions can be found in git though - the are properly tagged too. If you need a specific binary build I can probably provide it - I should have all the non-dailies on disk. (Contact me off-site.)


4

About 10 days from now - I just uploaded it. That'd make it right around x-mas. If you want it sooner, you can also use our builds from deb.tpo -- the tor website documents the sources.list entries.


4

I've just tested this in a CrunchBang 11 x64 VM. It should work in Ubuntu and the rest of the Debian family. First install Wireshark, by opening a terminal and running these commands: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade sudo apt-get install wireshark To configure wireshark to allow a non-root user to sniff packets, run these commands: sudo dpkg-...


4

The different levels are as follows (Tor Docs) ERROR critical issue occurred, the user needs to be notified WARN non-critical issue occurred that the user should be aware of NOTICE information that is helpful to the user INFO high level library activity DEBUG low level library activity TRACE request/reply logging ...


4

I found out that tor was blocked by SElinux. I disabled SElinux and everything was working.


3

At the moment the meek packages are landing in debian so we can expect them to arrive in ubuntu too. UPDATE Previous info are not working fine anymore, it looks there is now a repository for debian unstable ... so I changed my previous answer with this one: 1 Add Repository Repository (info on the repository page). 2. Install meek-client package sudo ...


3

If the application appears to be running correctly under Wine, you can assume it is fully functional. The execution environment should not affect the application's behaviour. One consideration is that perhaps malware targeting Windows can now attack your Tor session.


3

You are correct in the way you are doing it, what you can do is to remove the key\hostname file located where the hidden service stored it. First make sure you are in the right folder by checking the torrc file, nano /etc/tor/torrc scroll down to where it says hidden services, check what folder your hidden service points to. When that's done you can get ...


3

This info seems obsolete. On the 'Pi: sudo apt-get install tor ...now results in a working install. (Of course, you must appropriately edit torrc and then restart the service.)


3

The keyserver TorBirdy is configured to use by default is a Tor Hidden Service, so yes. In the event you alter the default keyserver to a different one, the answer is also yes. Documentation for TorBirdy is here: https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/torbirdy


3

You are not doing anything wrong. The message you see is in fact a false alarm. According to the arm maintainer: That message simply means that tor is currently running with the 'RunAsDaemon' option enabled, but this setting isn't in your torrc. This message is meant to help people who edit their torrc, forget to restart tor, and are then confused ...


3

You can run any command as a different user using sudo: sudo -u my_user tor-browser-en If you need to use multiple commands you can do this: sudo -u my_user sh -c "first && second" If you want to background the application, you should not do this (it will only work as expected if you're already authenticated with sudo): sudo -u my_user tor-...


3

When you want to start via command line you need to do it as the correct user. As the message says it expects debian-tor. So call Tor in the following way: sudo -u debian-tor tor


3

Well, it depends on the relay's place in the chain: Entry node - yes, you can use EntryNodes {us},{fr} for example, to specify the countries USA and France Middle node - via configuration file - no, but if using Tor control protocol - yes, physically possible, but not a good idea(I'll explain it later). Exit node - yes, you can use ExitNodes {us},{fr} and ...


2

When exactly, is never known with Debian project. You can watch the Debian Package Tracking System for news and the todo of the package. If you want to make the package enter early, check the TODO and look what you do to help. This is the Tor package page: http://packages.qa.debian.org/t/tor.html


2

in terminal type gnome-session-properties then check the tor option in list if tor is not in the list then you can add it


2

you should create new onion domain with its private key. Making Onion Domain you will have to use software Shallot. If you have Linux at your home PC/Laptop, just install shallot (./configure && make) and use it (./shallot ^test). If you use Windows, you will have to use virtualbox + linux iso file, and then install shallot. I chose bodhi linux ...


2

The measured bandwidth is mostly determined by external measurements by the Bandwidth Authorities. The following should help explain it... https://blog.torproject.org/blog/lifecycle-of-a-new-relay


2

The Tor Hidden Service dir should not be set to the same directory as your web root (it contains your private key among other things, which you don't want to serve up on your website) Use a separate directory that is only accessible by your Tor user. Eg. HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/myblog/ HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:80 and then be sure to set some ...


2

When you say "My tor exit node was 31.172.30.4:443", I presume you do not mean that you are the operator of the nicknamed chaoscomputerclub21 Tor node. I think you mean that the Tor node in use as an exit node, for one or more of your Tor client's open circuits, was at that IP address. Your Tor client will create multiple circuits at one time, and over ...


2

If you installed it via apt you can easily update it with apt-get upgrade. Your fingerprint shouldn't get lost during that process. For safety reasons backup your private key file. It is in the following directory: /var/lib/tor/keys/secret_id_key


2

You need to make sure that these lines exist in the serverside torrc configuration: HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/ftp-service/ HiddenServicePort 21 127.0.0.1:21 You should also make sure you use your ftp client over the Tor network, for example, use Tor as a SOCKS proxy for your FTP client. You can use FileZilla over Tor to do this. Firstly, install ...


2

No. The tor package available through apt-get isn't needed or related to using Tor Browser. As such the steps you performed as root won't affect the steps you performed to install Tor Browser, assuming you followed the steps given on the Tor Project site, e.g.: # Download Tor Browser and it's signature wget https://www.torproject.org/dist/torbrowser/6.0.7/...


1

I'll summarize the discussion from the comments and the chat here: The original poster had a system-wide installation of Tor in their Debian system and furthermore installed a Tor Browser. The system-wide torrc which lives in /etc/tor is different from the one which Tor Browser uses. The configuration from the Tor Browser usually lives inside its ...


1

I am not aware of any method to map .onion addresses to local IP addresses like you described, so I am going to propose an alternative approach. When connecting to an onion SSH service, use the following command syntax: ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no user@host That will make ssh bypass the KnownHosts files and not ask for ...


1

You can set the PROXY environment variable to use tor for this account in your ~/.bashrc file: export http_proxy=http://DOMAIN\USERNAME:PASSWORD@SERVER:PORT/ It will work for some applications that read those variables but not for all. You can also use iptables to filter packet sent by a specific user application. This will work if you run tor as root. ...


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