6

Error 403 and CAPTCHA are appearing because the exit node you're using is not dedicated to you only: Many people are using it, including to access Google and other services. It seems - on a website server's side - that one single IP address (the exit node) generates too many requests per time and a different requests/user sessions, so it can interpret it as ...


5

The list of exit nodes is well known so it's trivial for any system to look up into that list and see if any incoming connection comes from any of them.


5

You cannot. Bridges only serve as entry points to the network, their purpose is to get you onto the tor network through potentially uncensored means. They are simply private guards which are not listed in the tor consensus to make it harder for a censor to know that it is a tor node, after the first hop to the bridge, tor operates as it would normally. The ...


4

It may not be the comprehensive answer you are looking for, but it's very common for larger companies to offsource the majority of their infrastructure gruntwork, including the handling and building of plain IP blocklists in response to perceived attacks. If you look for IP reputation, you'll find that there are lots of companies offering such a service, ...


3

If you were using the Tor Browser in the recommended way, then there's nothing to worry about; your real IP address won't have been exposed, and the site could only have seen the IP address of the exit node. The fact that the site blocked access means you didn't get as far as doing anything that might have made you traceable, like logging in with your ...


3

No.Cloudflare only knows the IP address of one of the tor exit relays. When you use Tor, you are sending queries through exit relays that are also shared by thousands of other users. Tor users typically see this message when many Tor users are querying Cloudflare in a short period of time. Cloudflare interprets the high volume of traffic from a single IP ...


3

Thanks for the catch! Fixed... https://gitweb.torproject.org/stem.git/commitdiff/f46974987106e3246482158e009491faa07bbae4


3

Yes, you need to use a bridge in this case and if they are blocking Tor-traffic in general you also have to use the obfsproxy which is scrambling the Tor traffic so it looks like normal HTTP traffic. Checkout obfsproxy site on torproject for more details.


2

They can get your browser dimensions (for fingerprinting) if using javascript. That's especially a concern when they demand that you have to allow google scripts to run... though it seems that most times I can solve a Cloudfront captcha without allowing google. I could never solve a captcha at google.com itself (on those very few times when I would actually ...


2

If this is Futaba (2chan) then you are out of luck. It keeps one of the largest public proxy lists in the world. You'll do better buying some really good private proxies or very small VPNs or VPSes.


2

One way to circumvent the blockage is to send the output of Tor network to a VPN or Web proxy as shown blow: Client---Tor---VPN---Destination site or Client---Tor---Web proxy---Destination site To show more detail it would look like this: Client---Guard---middle node---exit node---VPN---Destination site or Client---Guard---middle node---exit node---...


2

Some websites tend to block IP addresses of Tor exit nodes because the abuse they get from some users anonymously accessing the site using the Tor network. When the website takes such decision, there is no way to circumvent it, as long as they keep their list of Tor exit nodes updated (which they usually do). If the website in question allow users to make ...


2

This is a self beating procedure. As "nobody" has mentioned, "When you logged in without using Tor, you got your IP (address) correlated with your account, which can figure out your IP (address) even if you started Tor then". Now there is one additional issue, not only you are not anonymous but, the destination WEB site can figure out you are using Tor in ...


2

It's not your settings. I have experienced the same thing, however they are not blocking all Tor exit nodes. With Tails, you can switch your IP easily using Vidalia, and after trying foxnews just now I was able to get in on the 4th IP change. They most likely have banned various IPs one at a time. As a parallel, on some sites that use Disqus and have a lot ...


2

There are a few reasons why you may not be able to log in to a website with tor browser. The three main ones would be The site might specifically be blocking tor users from logging in. The login might require javascript, flash, or some form of cookie that the tor browser bundle has disabled for security reasons. The site rate limits requests or logins by ip ...


2

The website http://www.3quarksdaily.com/ uses CloudFlare and CloudFlare has special access rules. When they see a Tor exit relay the website operator can choose from four options let the traffic go through (whitelist) show a CAPTCHA show a JavaScript challenge or completely block the traffic. It seems 3quarksdaily.com (or Typepad) has chosen to block Tor ...


1

It's not possible to hide this from websites. Unless the website operators unblock Tor, there is nothing you can do. You said right in your question "they are forbidden clones," which means you are using Tor to do something you shouldn't be doing anyway.


1

Google and Facebook run commercial services. They can block whoever they want to for whatever reason. If they wanted to block all Tor users, for no reason whatsoever, then that would be their prerogative. All the Tor community can do is to lobby them - through organisations such as the EFF - and ask them kindly not to. My question: Are you actively ...


1

Try to use Meek pluggable transport, and if it won't help, post your error log and torrc here, so I'll be able to assist you further


1

You could run TorDNSEL and cache the DNS information locally. That will allow you to only have to check once. Another thing is that you could simply download the consensus form any directory mirror. This will give you precise information that you can build a lookup table upon. There also is Onionoo. You could create a cron job or something in your ...


1

This isn't a question about Tor. It really boils down to: How do I programmatically check whether two websites are the same? Where those two websites are, 1) the site when browsing without Tor, 2) the site when browsing with Tor. (Assuming you won't be comprimised in any way by browsing the site without using Tor.) At the most simplistic level, you could ...


1

Some web sites block all Tor exit nodes. Some even block all Tor relays, also non-exits. The only way to access those sites is to connect from a different IP. Not from a Tor node. You can use a proxy/VPN.


1

First off, airbnb.com worked fine in my testing when using Tor Browser. I think it was probably a transient error in their system/a temporary spam prevention measure. To answer your question: Yes, it is possible that websites check whether you're using Tor. The first big tell is getting a connection from a known exit node, but it's not the only thing. Just ...


1

You can change the proxy settings to use no proxy. When you logged in without using Tor, you got your IP correlated with your account, which can figure out your IP even if you started Tor then.


1

At customs, they don't scan the contents of your hard drive(s). They just scan the laptop with x-rays to be sure you're not hiding something else inside it. That is unless of course you were on their criminal list or you were arrested and they decided to deep-search all your belongings. Anyway, answering the first part of your question, Tor Browser is one ...


1

As pointed out Cloudflare is doing some changes on their infrastructure, ongoing discussion on the tor-talk mailing list. Situation should be fixed soon.


1

You could try multiple VPN services to see if one works, but it could end up being blocked at any point. If accessing these sites matters enough to you, setting up your own VPN on a VPS in Japan (ideally from a popular Japan-based company) might be worth the trouble and money.


1

You could use another proxy after Tor, which is not blocked by the service. Me -> Tor -> Vpn [How?]


1

The error message is very clear: «You are not allowed to use Proxy/VPN» Using Tor is similar to use a proxy, so they probably acted to block it. So you would need to convince them to lift the block, although IMHO that seems unlikely.


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