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5

A lot of us are running on Raspberry Pi. Almost every hardware setup can handle some amount of traffic. One just dials down the amount of bandwidth one is willing to advertise or accept in the configuration file. There are a whole range of relay capabilities. You can see a list of their bandwidths at http://torstatus.blutmagie.de/. The fastest relays ...


3

You'd need to run two Tor instances, one for the published relay and the other for the bridge. The important part will be in specifying the correct IP address to bind to and listen on for the obfs4proxy and orports. Assuming you had two IP addresses with 1.1.1.1 being your relay and 2.2.2.2 being your bridge, your config would look something like this /...


3

Setting up your own bridge on a standard Linux system is not very difficult. Any cloud provider that provides you with an Debian or Ubuntu option would be a good start. Get the base image, install the debian packages Tor provides and configure your torrc accordingly. Optionally, add pluggable transports. Voilà. Maybe this should just be documented ...


3

You need to make sure that these lines exist in the serverside torrc configuration: HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/ftp-service/ HiddenServicePort 21 127.0.0.1:21 You should also make sure you use your ftp client over the Tor network, for example, use Tor as a SOCKS proxy for your FTP client. You can use FileZilla over Tor to do this. Firstly, install ...


2

If you installed it via apt you can easily update it with apt-get upgrade. Your fingerprint shouldn't get lost during that process. For safety reasons backup your private key file. It is in the following directory: /var/lib/tor/keys/secret_id_key


2

All traffic issues from within Whonix-Workstation will either be routed through Tor or not routed at all. It's the very core of what Whonix is good for.


2

Yes it makes, you're adding a corresponding entry in /etc/hosts and just making this : Add an additional localhost interface lo0:0 with 127.0.1.1/24 subnet Modify your lo0 to shorter scope 127.0.0.1/24 - they must not intersect/interfere with an interface from pt.1 Make tor bind it's DNS to 127.0.0.2:53 Install ISC Bind and tie it to 127.0.0.1:53 Tell bind ...


2

This is a good list of the information you are looking for: https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/GoodBadISPs


2

You can SSH to your server through Tor using two different methods: Via an exit node, where your connection to your VPS goes into the Tor network at your local machine (where you're SSHing from), goes through the onion layers, goes out an exit node, then travels over the regular Internet from the exit node to your VPS. This doesn't require any ...


1

I'll make it short and easy: a VPN does nothing conducive to anonymity (it is neither beneficial nor redundant regarding to anonymity): https://www.torproject.org/docs/faq#IsTorLikeAVPN Easily explained for casual users: It just makes it seem you are entering "the network" from a different place/country... and depending on your setup (VPN -> Tor vs. Tor -...


1

OK solved the problem after a thorough research. This update was required: Update for Desktop Experience Decoder for Windows Server 2008 R2 (KB2483177) https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/confirmation.aspx?id=13283 Thanks


1

It is not uncommon that VPS providers have strange times on their machines. In the past it helped me to kindly ask them to correct the time. Usually they corrected it and the problem disappeared. However if your VPS provider won't cooperate, you can try to change the clock manually. So stop the Tor process, enter the correct time and restart the process. ...


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