9

Tails might be your best bet The Amnesic Incognito Live System or Tails is a Debian-based Linux distribution aimed at preserving privacy and anonymity. It is the next iteration of development on the previous Gentoo based Incognito Linux distribution. All its outgoing connections are forced to go through Tor, and direct (non-anonymous) connections ...


4

The correct syntax is as follows: ExcludeExitNodes {fr},{de},{??} StrictNodes 1 This should work for you.


4

It has it's uses, of course! At least: Integrity you know, that your server is responsible for cipher strength, and a potential malicious node in a chain will have some trouble-time due to that fact for sure Client accounting a very handy option of having client certificates is a powerful tool! Bot protecton lots of HTTP picktools are lacking of strong ...


4

Only your internet surfing through the Tor browser is "protected" by using the Tor network, not the system (Operating System). You can install the Tor service along with Obfsproxy and configure your system to route your network connections through the Tor port (usually 9050) however it requires some set up and configuration through Command Prompt/Terminal ...


3

If you need Tor access for work purposes, make arrangements through management. If it's for personal use, use your own device and network connection, such as a WiFi AP. Circumventing your employer's network security might get you fired. Also, even if you succeed, IT staff could observe your activities, and that might get you fired, or worse.


3

You could use a virtual machine if you don't have an extra computer for Tails and install Whonix on it. Whonix has a gateway VM which works like a router and a workstation which connects to it. All traffic goes through Tor. https://www.whonix.org/


3

I admit that I've never done this, but looking through the man page I think you might find the TrackHostExits option useful: This option is useful if you frequently connect to sites that will expire all your authentication cookies (i.e. log you out) if your IP address changes. Alternatively the MapAddress option may do the trick. When a request for ...


3

If tor is configured to use a pluggable transport, you can't set Socks*Proxy or HTTP*Proxy. The reason is that tor does not make connections to relays or directory servers itself anymore, but instead delegates that job to the pluggable transport, a dedicated process running outside of tor. If you want to proxify your connection to the Tor network, you need ...


3

There is a tutorial how to use Raspberry Pi to make your own torified Wi-Fi.


3

You can make the SOCKS proxy (which is what applications use to send traffic through Tor) useable by the local network. However, I don't know whether you can easily configure the tablet to use the proxy. The applications on the tablet can selectively disregard the proxy settings.


3

Obfs3 and Obfs4 have a goal of obscuring traffic so that it looks like arbitrary random data. Some environments have created policies such that if the protocol identified via deep packet inspection is unknown, block it. By design, obfs3/4 will never be fingerprinted as an existing protocol and therefore blocked these environments. When you attempted to ...


3

Yes, the .onion address stays the same no matter what network you're using to connect to the Tor network.


3

Yes, Tor is unaffected by KRACK. At best KRACK could be used to perform some denial of service (stopping your packets from being sent), but it will not be able to forge or intercept Tor traffic, since it is end-to-end crypted before it is sent over the network. Assuming you have a good copy of Tor (you both verified it's signed by the correct key and that ...


3

Tor connections are in general secure. However for a global adversary it would be possible to trace a Tor connection back to a user. It is not known whether such a global adversary exists or if this has ever happened. So far all known deanonymization attacks were done using JavaScript. All Tor nodes are public and can be retrieved by anyone (e.g. ...


2

This is very old thread discussed everywhere. The best solution for you, is to read the official FAQ, so called "Wiki". See here the Tor Project Wiki page on IsolatingProxy. Take a look, there are two ways: Isolating Proxy Transparent Proxy The "Transparent Proxy's" way is the oldest one, there are configurations for all type of OS: Windows, Linux, BSD, ...


2

Your best bet would probably be to configure the firewall to only allow Tor traffic through. I don't have experience with the firewall in mac or linux but in windows it seems possible. If you can't find firewall setup open Run (Windows Key + R) and type WF.msc. It seems some things like Internet Explorer aren't in the allow list and are allowed by default, ...


2

The Tor Browser Bundle should not need any configuration to work with a standard computer. It looks like either something has gone wrong with your installation or there is a bug. If you post further information on what you installed, how, and the error message you saw, we can provide more help.


2

If this is Futaba (2chan) then you are out of luck. It keeps one of the largest public proxy lists in the world. You'll do better buying some really good private proxies or very small VPNs or VPSes.


2

This is possible. You first need to get a fake IP for the specific region, then you need to activate the Flash plugin, which by default is disabled in the Tor Browser. Check the answer of IP address in specific city for IP address and the answer of Why can't Tor Browser use Adobe Flash Player? for Flash plugin.


2

Tails uses UTC time. But the time of most devices is set up to the timezone of their sale, which can be considered as de-anonimization. What I usually do is manual explicit setting the hardware clock to UTC. It is especially true for my own devices which I plan to use often with Tails. It can be quickly done via BIOS, for example - just one more reboot ...


2

Ah, I see now I want an Isolating Proxy (https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/TorifyHOWTO/IsolatingProxy). I've been looking through the documentation and wiki and didn't find it. Looking through posts here with the network-configuration tag did the trick. Sorry to be a bother, but perhaps someone else can find this and quickly get the answer. ...


2

There are multiple correct answers to a question like this because its vauge. If you want a whonix copy why not use whonix? One other easy way to build a gateway would be to download the openwrt x86 iso and install it to its own virtual machine, then install and configure tor as a transparent proxy, then configure your networking to use the interfaces on ...


2

Should be fine. You're just affecting connections originating at your own machine. Whether it is safe to use drupal's autoupdater at all is something you have to ask yourself, of course.


2

The important bit of information from the logs is Network is unreachable [WSAENETUNREACH ]; NOROUTE. (Second line from the bottom.) A couple of ideas: Check you can connect to the internet normally (i.e. without using Tor). If you're using your cellphone as a hotspot, is your phone connecting to the internet via 3G/4G, or via WiFi? If via WiFi (perhaps in ...


2

First try "connect directly to Tor network". Normally it works. If it doesn't work then check whether you are using any proxy to connect to internet or not. Bridges are required when your ISP stops connecting to Tor network.


2

You are right, this can be achieved by using iptables. This is described in Tor documentation. So, as a root, type: iptables -F OUTPUT iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -m owner --uid-owner debian-tor iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -o lo #used to allow traffic over the loopback device and is completely safe. iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -p udp --dport 123 #allow ...


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