Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
5

Instead of blocking the access from the firewall (iptables), it is easier to block it from the browser itself. If you are using Firefox or Iceweasel, you can disable Javascript completely (using NoScript addon, or any similar addon). If you don't want to disable Javascript, you can disable only WebRTC connections. To do that, enter about:config in your ...


4

I found the issue after some reading. The VirtualAddrNetwork setting was the same as the dhcp pool in my network configuration so when .onion domains were returned the browser was attempting to forward traffic to an address on my local area network, which was not the correct configuration. If anyone is interested I can post the config files, but a much ...


4

I've just tested this in a CrunchBang 11 x64 VM. It should work in Ubuntu and the rest of the Debian family. First install Wireshark, by opening a terminal and running these commands: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade sudo apt-get install wireshark To configure wireshark to allow a non-root user to sniff packets, run these commands: sudo dpkg-...


2

You are right, this can be achieved by using iptables. This is described in Tor documentation. So, as a root, type: iptables -F OUTPUT iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -m owner --uid-owner debian-tor iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -o lo #used to allow traffic over the loopback device and is completely safe. iptables -A OUTPUT -j ACCEPT -p udp --dport 123 #allow ...


1

usually yes... first the easiest one, because of error-proneness: i'm pretty sure the configuration (and code) of the mentioned projects is reviewed much more often than the configuration of someones single setup. and its not just about how accessing the network, it is also about the clients and their configuration: --> the idea is to be not just anonymous (...


1

sys-whonix is not set up to forward packets between VMs, and doing has not been evaluated for leaks. Instead, qrexec should be used for inter-vm communication. In dom0, create a file /etc/qubes-rpc/policy/local.ssh containing the line: srcVMname destVMname allow Replace with the actual names of your VMs. Repeat this line for as many connection pairs as ...


1

They allow access to local network resources but deny DNS and the i2p service, to prevent accidental leaks. From ferm.conf: # Local network connections should not go through Tor but DNS shall be # rejected. I2P is explicitly blocked from communicating with the LAN. # (Note that we exclude the VirtualAddrNetwork used for .onion:s ...


1

First install ferm by running sudo apt-get install ferm Use Tails' ferm.conf as a base and removing Tails' restrictions on localhost connections (you can add these back if required but a lot of them are based around Tails specific accounts which won't exist on your stock debian), then you'd create a ruleset like this: domain ip { table filter { ...


1

You can use netstat to see exactly what IPs are connecting directly. The 127.0.0.1 in your logs is what's seen by applications, rather than the server itself. The server will see your entry guards, though if you set Tor to log very verbosely, you might be able to see the other 3 nodes, up to the rendezvous node. Everything past that (the other 3 nodes) is ...


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