8

Using such a system only prevents IP address leaks. The Tor Browser has many, many patches to reduce fingerprintability and fix privacy-breaking bugs. Think of it like this: Does it really help that no one can get your IP, if they can potentially link up all of your online identities? There are various and subtle ways of tracking a browser across the web ...


5

This is not a good idea, in theory at least. (False security as programs may leak data) Adafruit offers a tutorial on how to do this using a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian (which is based on Debian). This should work fine on most Linux distros. sudo apt-get install tor Edit the tor config file by running sudo nano /etc/tor/torrc and copy ...


3

For the transparent proxy functionality of Tor to work you also need to set Tor as your DNS server, normally by setting the DNSPort torrc option to 53 and changing your /etc/resolv.conf. See the TransPort instructions for more hints. Without altering your resolver settings, DNS requests will go out to the Internet – not only leaking DNS but also failing to ...


3

This is what I did and all is fine now: Reboot into ClockworkMod recovery Select advanced Wipe Dalvik cache Wipe cache partition Reboot All is working fine Hope this works for you.


3

I have solved this question. Source; an extensive iptables manual. The REDIRECT target puts the stream into the conntrack table, and rewrites the destination host to that of the machine itself. That was one thing I was missing. This circumvents the firewall; so even if normally no packages would reach the machine at the defined port, the packet/stream ...


3

You should prefer torsocks over proxychains, since torsocks is intended to block potential leaks. Especially in cases with tools like youtube-dl which might try to pass over execution to programs that can make network connections of their own in unexpected or attacker controlled ways. Specifically with proxychains, if anything wrapped in proxychains tries ...


2

As Peter already said it is not supported and I think it would hurt anonymity and performance. If Tor would keep track of the exits it used and discards them as exits for later circuits it will run out of exits to use. This narrows down where you will exit. If an attacker, who has guards and exits, could make Tor create new circuits he will be able to ...


2

No, Tor has no direct support for tracking which middle or exit nodes you use. It'd probably be a bad idea anyway.


2

Configuring another browser to connect using Tor is reasonably easy. The more difficult problems are: Making certain that all the traffic goes through Tor, including DNS requests. Eliminating all the means by which your browser can reveal your real IP. Making the data revealed via javascript, browser headers, ETags, etc agree with each other without ...


2

Based on mirimir's comment, To install Tor as a service, you can simply run: tor --service install


2

If I understand your question right, you're wondering about the link protocol that relays use to talk to each other. This protocol ensures that relays establish exactly one connection to each other, not a new connection per circuit they carry. Doing it that way has two advantages. One is anonymity: Multiple circuits are multiplexed over such a connection ...


2

I'm not sure that Linostar's answer is correct. Rather, I think that Tor is able to extract the original destination address using the SO_ORIGINAL_DST socket option, as described here: How does a transparent SOCKS proxy know which destination IP to use?


2

This is a very good question indeed, although it is more about how a tranparent proxy and iptables work. The corresponding rule in iptables to redirect to a transparent proxy is usually something like: iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -p tcp --syn -j REDIRECT --to-ports <port-number> What is happening in reality is that NAT Redirect does not change the ...


2

From my point-of-view, torsocks and using TransPort selectively for some applications (e.g. like Mike's suggested setup for Android) is quite equivalent. Two key differences, though: torsocks will take care of DNS leaks, so extra care is needed when using TransPort. torsocks 2.0 will take care of filtering and blocking some network system calls. Again, it ...


1

First install ferm by running sudo apt-get install ferm Use Tails' ferm.conf as a base and removing Tails' restrictions on localhost connections (you can add these back if required but a lot of them are based around Tails specific accounts which won't exist on your stock debian), then you'd create a ruleset like this: domain ip { table filter { ...


1

Looks like a documentation error. This should be raised as a ticket on the Tor Project Bug Tracker. There are details on the front page for an anonymous login, if required. I think that it should be of the format: VirtualAddrNetworkIPv6 [FC00::]/7 The default value, defined in the manual page is specified, in that format, as: [FE80::]/10 ...


1

You're trying to use a transparent proxy as an http proxy, this will not work. You will need to follow the iptables setup, or some kind of packetfilter that has REDIRECT-like fucntionality. Have a look at "How does Tor transparent proxying work?".


1

It's questionable whether it's an improvement to the existing way that a client generates certificates. Your HAProxy is basically converting your configuration into an pre-2014 Tor circuit building process because it will likely choose a separate entryguard for each circuit. This makes it statistically less secure which is why they switched to a semi-...


1

Closed. This was wrong iptables redirect rule that excludes loop from redirect devices: Was: #iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT ! -o lo -p udp -m owner --uid-owner anonymous -m udp --dport 53 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 53 Fix: iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -p udp -m owner --uid-owner anonymous -m udp --dport 53 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 53 Cause: /etc/resolv.conf ...


1

Add a new SOCKSPort line to your torrc file, located inside the Tor Browser folder in the sub-folder \Browser\TorBrowser\Data\Tor\torrc, setting it to be something like: SocksPort 0.0.0.0:9250 Ensure you've allowed traffic in to this port in any packet-filter/"firewall" on the operating system, then configure other applications on other systems on the ...


1

the best way - IMHO - is to use redsocks or IPTables/pf+TransPort and put a Tor node as a router to your network. Don't forget a DNS server too!


1

Two ways: The more hard way: install PRIVOXY and configure it to work as a 'transparent proxy' then let other machines on your LAN point the PRIVOXY ADDR. Simply way: let the program you use on other machines on the LAN and if the program permit proxy configuration, point to machine running tor server as SOCK5 port 9150, if you have not changed it on TOR ...


1

I believe what you're looking for is near the bottom of the settings screen in Orbot. There is a section for "Outbound network Proxy (Optional)" that lets you set an HTTP, HTTPS, Socks4, or Socks5 proxy.


1

https://tor.stackexchange.com/a/2131/743 this is a description of what I did when I implemented (using c# instead of c++ though, but it should be the same) here is a copy paste of the text Tor is a socks5 proxy. here is the socks5 rfc here is a guide to how socks5 works with tor read this, it is VERY useful if using sockets (I ...


1

There is no way to use the transparent proxying features with modern OS X. Apple removed ipfw (which is what natdport would use), and doesn't provide headers for pf so Tor can't reliably use it and disables the feature while building.


1

In such cases proxies usually performing at least one of the bad tricks like that: MitM attack by intruding into SSL/TLS connecions. Tor will give you an error because for directories it has hardcoded keys and on another screinario proxy just ruins the SSL handshake that it can't intervene into by-ip blocklists for Tor entry guards and directories. Instead ...


1

No insult intended, but that would be an ambitious project for someone asking a question like this ;) I recommend starting with Whonix. Whonix comprises two virtual machines (VMs). One is a Tor gateway aka "middlebox" and the other is a workstation. Both are Debian. The workstation includes the standard Tor browser and many other apps that are configured to ...


1

Not sure about adding more rules but from what I understand having a drop all incoming and outgoing policy is a good thing to start from. Afterward , building your rule-set to punch holes in the wall. The addition of the lo rules is needed in a set up like that so it's good that you added them there. So, since you only have two major rules, EVERYTHING is ...


1

The first things, I usually check,when I have this kind of problems, are: /etc/resolv.conf verify, if used, firewall rules use a traceroute command to follow the path done from your data I give as sure you already verified, but if not check correct gateway configuration Usually the first point is the goal: a lot of people forget to setup correctly the ...


1

Tor clients only use TCP to connect to nodes. hash:ip,port defaults to TCP, so you don't need to specify a protocol. You may be interested in https://github.com/rustybird/corridor, which builds exactly the ipset you want from the current consensus.


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