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From the Arch Linux Wiki: chromium --proxy-server="socks5://127.0.0.1:9050" --host-resolver-rules="MAP * 0.0.0.0 , EXCLUDE myproxy" However as the wiki explicitly warns: this will be used for fetching http and https only, a great deal of work was put into ensuring "Proxy Obedience" in Tor Browser. Forcing Chromium to fetch content outside of the Tor proxy ...


2

This won't work, given that Tor Browser ships with a specific default profile which it uses, and needs to use to operate properly, creating and utilising different profiles will cause issues. Instead, have multiple installations of Tor Browser (each extracted to a distinct folder) which will provide superior isolation between identities and profiles for ...


2

From the Tor manual: Other options can be specified on the command-line in the format "--option value", in the format "option value", or in a configuration file. For instance, you can tell Tor to start listening for SOCKS connections on port 9999 by passing --SocksPort 9999 or SocksPort 9999 to it on the command line, or by putting "SocksPort 9999" in the ...


1

These are threads, this is normal. They're not multiple instances of firefox but instead a single instance that has multiple threads created for it. This may be more apparent if you press F5 to view it as a tree, you will see a main firefox instance with multiple children. When a process wants to run tasks in parallel it will often create a new thread. The ...


1

Torsocks sets the LD_PRELOAD environment variable to intercept a few system calls. It does not matter if you use it recursively: # at first $LD_PRELOAD is unset $ echo $LD_PRELOAD # when we start a torsocks shell is $LD_PRELOAD is set $ torsocks --shell /usr/bin/torsocks: New torified shell coming right up... $ echo $LD_PRELOAD /usr/lib/torsocks/...


1

Generally speaking, if it works with torsocks wrapping it, it should be fine. torsocks can cause some features to break but it shouldn't result in any leaks under normal circumstances. It's hard to tell without thorough review if any program is 100% safe, but outside of a few common situations where it may leak most applications should be fine.


1

Here's the Linux way to do it: In a terminal, use "sudo service tor stop." If that doesn't work, try going to System Monitor and ending the process from there. If THAT doesn't work, go to your terminal and type in "sudo killall tor". That should make Tor go away.


1

You're trying to use a specific country code with no GeoIP database. Since IPs don't actually have any relationship to countries at all you need a database of made up links between IP address and country to fool Tor into believing the same lie. Specifically you need to define a GeoIPFile and a GeoIPv6File. These files are the old format of GeoIP database ...


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9050 is a builtin default, from the Tor Manual... SocksPort [address:]port|unix:path|auto [flags] [isolation flags] Open this port to listen for connections from SOCKS-speaking applications. Set this to 0 if you don’t want to allow application connections via SOCKS. Set it to "auto" to have Tor pick a port for you. This directive can be specified ...


1

You can send any command over Tor with torify or torsocks. Example: torsocks wget https://path/to/file or torify apt-get update or torsocks git clone https://path/to/git or even ssh, scp or sftp over Tor torsocks ssh user@host


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Assuming you want to do this using apt-get, rather than building from source, you can use torify in the following way: # torify apt-get update # torify apt-get install <jdk_packages> [A similar solution was offered here: https://tor.stackexchange.com/a/839/1730]


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