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Update: 2016-04-17 Qubes-Whonix integration is now extremely good. I use it myself and highly recommend it. (Qubes TorVM is now deprecated.) You can read all about Qubes-Whonix on the Qubes website here and on the Whonix website here. Thanks go to adrelanos and all the other devs whose hard work made this happen. Old answer (2014-08-17): Qubes TorVM ...


4

You should run 'VBoxLinuxAdditions.run' file, not the autorun.sh. Syntax: bash VBoxLinuxAdditions.run


2

Tor should work fine on ARM CPUs. On distributions like Debian there are Tor versions for arm, arm64, armel, armhf (even mips, mipsel and powerpc). The Tor Project themselves also distribute debian packages for armhf and armel. Fedora (and likely other redhat derivatives) also distributes a [Tor package for armv7hl. ArchLinux for ARM similarly package Tor ...


2

I would strongly recommend against this. Infact other software that requires dkms modules is explicitly recommended against by the Tails developers. It is not officially supported by them. Inserting random code into the kernel may entirely violate protections intended to be provided by Tails. I'm unsure if it is possible to include extra kernel drivers ...


2

You can do this with Whonix for example, which is a ready-to-run virtual machine that acts as a tor proxy. All the details on how to do this is here: https://www.whonix.org/wiki/Other_Operating_Systems


2

There are multiple correct answers to a question like this because its vauge. If you want a whonix copy why not use whonix? One other easy way to build a gateway would be to download the openwrt x86 iso and install it to its own virtual machine, then install and configure tor as a transparent proxy, then configure your networking to use the interfaces on ...


1

There are several online tools that allow you to test the fingerprint of Tor Browser and other browsers. For example, the Electronic Frontier Foundation's panopticlick.eff.org. Using these tools, it is straightforward to get a general idea of the uniqueness of your fingerprint with different browsers. For example, using Panopticlick while running the ...


1

The first things, I usually check,when I have this kind of problems, are: /etc/resolv.conf verify, if used, firewall rules use a traceroute command to follow the path done from your data I give as sure you already verified, but if not check correct gateway configuration Usually the first point is the goal: a lot of people forget to setup correctly the ...


1

Generally the virtualisation of choice is VirtualBox, see: Tails VirtualBox documentation However, also heed the warnings. Tails do not recommend using VirtualBox for day-to-day use. It's there mostly to help with testing. Running Tails inside a virtual machine has various security implications. Depending on the host operating system and your security ...


1

The host machine has a mac and the virtual machine also has a mac (not related to host machine's mac), tails spoofs the mac on the virtual machine - not the host machine. This means : Host machine's mac is never modified by tails when you run it in virtualbox. But the virtual machine's mac is modified by tails. You can check the virtual machine's mac in ...


1

It's easier to explain using this scheme: I may be wrong, I'm not a very active Tails user.


1

If you will be able to put them in different C-class subnets on a static IPv4 addresses - then run as much as you need. Actually, you can set the cpu count to 2, it's ok because the crypto part in Tor is still single-thread


1

Tor works pretty fine on ARM - I'm running my nodes on ARM SBC's myself. You need to compile it by hand and OpenSSL and Libevent to avoid perfomance loss. If you need specific instructions - just say it!


1

This usually happens when your whonix version is 9.4 or below. It is a known bug that will be fixed in version 9.6. For now, here is how you can fix it: Open a terminal in Whonix, then copy & paste the following lines into it: fpr="916B8D99C38EAF5E8ADC7A2A8D66066A2EEACCDA" gpg --recv-keys "$fpr" gpg --fingerprint "$fpr" gpg --export "$fpr" | sudo apt-...


1

Do you mean relays or clients with browsers? Your mention of users and screens and browsers suggests the latter. The question you link to is also about Tor Browser, not relays. A ready-made Tor client + Browser that you could run in a VM is Tails. I would question the usefulness of a ready-made relays because For relays it is not important to look ...


1

If you're not a relay and if you're not hosting a hidden service, then you can run multiple instances with exactly the same config. If you are running a hidden service, then each introduction point will use the one that it heard about last. All instances should function though. If you are running a relay, then each instance must have its own unique keys ...


1

You could check the list of Guard nodes from onionoo, for example at this Web site: https://onionoo.torproject.org You may also filter the traffic to the addresses of your interest for better visibility.


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Sorry I did not understand your question at first. You should be able to run other operating systems with a whonix gateway. You will just need to configure the network connection of the workstation. I would boot up the workstation that comes with whonix and look at the network configuration and use those same settings on the workstation of your choice. ...


1

This is unsupported. Full disclosure: I am a developer of Whonix.


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I've yet to find a better way to do it, but the problem is that Firefox either can't resolve .onion domains, or resolution of .onion is blocked in newer versions of Firefox. You'll need to configure your browser to use Tor's SOCKS proxy to surf .onion domains (Preferences >> Advanced >> Network >> Settings). In your case, 127.0.0.1 might not be the SOCKS ...


1

Running Tails in a VM is not recommended since the host OS and VirtualBox itself can see what you're doing inside the VM. And if your host OS is infected/owned, the attacker can see what you do on Tails as well. I recommend reading Tails warning page before doing anything. And maybe install Tails on a USB stick instead of running it on a VM. And oh, the ...


1

I wrote a guide for this, I was asked to transcribe it to the Tor Project wiki so that it was as easier to find resource (and so that I didn't have editorial authority over it). You can find the wiki page here TorBrowserBundleSAQ, as far as I am aware there have been no changes to it since I originally transcribed it from my original version but edits, ...


1

The checklist is: pluggable transports: obfs3, obfs4, meek pre-seeding first on a working conection using no entry guards post your logs, so I'll be able to help you further UPDATE: So thats "what is this, what it's for and how exactly can it help in your case": Grade-zero: a very valuable addition to your question will be a tor run log, so it will be ...


1

Short answer: If you're sure you understand and accept the fingerprinting risks, then yes, it's fine to use regular Firefox (or any application) in an AppVM connected to a Whonix-Gateway. Longer answer: It sounds like you may be conflating Qubes OS with Qubes-Whonix. Qubes OS can run many different types of VMs in addition to Whonix-based VMs. So, the ...


1

Your second computer must have two separate ISP's with different IP addresses, and it should be no problem at all : you will use two virtual machines, one for "using net securely", you will connect to it's VNC through Tor for a first time via first Internet connection, and this VM will go outside through a second VM, that will be a Tor router, WAN-bridged to ...


1

Don't do that. Try Tor over VPN or JAP or (chained) proxies or something else. Is running Tor over Tor dangerous?


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Have you investigated Whonix as a possibility? Basically two virtual machines, a gateway and a workstation. 1 VM to act as a workstation, the other VM acts as a gateway and funnels all traffic through Tor. https://www.whonix.org/


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