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In the torrc there is 'uncomment this to mirror directory information for others, please do if you have enough bandwith'

I basically would have some bandwith free but my router is out of RAM. But this isn't the question... Why is there an option DirPortFrontPage /etc/tor/tor-exit-notice.html?

Mirroring a Tor Directory doesn't not make you to an exit node, doesn't it? So what risks are if you mirror a Tor directory? Is it safe with the law to do it at home?

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Well, it's a HTTP GET mirror just like rsync tool, but only from the network consensus: it caches the cryptographically signed answers from the main directory servers. The DirPortFrontPage /etc/tor/tor-exit-notice.html is just an index.html page for the browser that will just open your IP+port without any url specified. It's considered to be an informational page that it's a Tor exit node. My good advice to you - use a standard Apache(preferable) or NGinx index page to trick the DPI scanners. Some ISP's or censoring parties do scan actively for tor directory mirrors

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  • Ok, but I'm not an exit relay when I'm mirroring a directory, and a directory is not an exit relay too, isn't it? So the confusion is, why is the tor-exit-notice.html for DirPortFrontPage specified?
    – france1
    Jan 11 at 13:42
  • you don't have to be an exit relay to sustain a mirror - and you should mirror it. Mirror and the exit are different roles, not mutually exclusive
    – Alexey Vesnin
    Jan 13 at 2:26
  • So I can safely mirror without having trouble with the law. Thank you, you can edit your answer.
    – france1
    Jan 16 at 8:18
  • Mirroring a list of IP addresses digitally signed for integrity is legal everywhere: you're not mirroring any resources that can be blocked/banned/censored - you're just mirroring a set of signed lists. It's like hosting a dot-torrent file: it's legal - it's just a text file with a publicly available data and the irreversible hash of the file whatever copyrighted it's contents are
    – Alexey Vesnin
    Jan 16 at 20:50

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