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I would like to anonymously contact a company I work for using my home internet using fictitious name, and email address. I will not provide my phone number and address. Is it possible to do this without my real name or IP address being revealed to the company I work for? What is the chances that The company I work for will be able to figure out who actually I am?

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    It will hide your IP, but it will show up as the IP of a Tor exit node, so they will be able to tell that it was someone using Tor. So if you are known for using or even mentioning Tor, and the comment you leave is the same thing you have been saying all along, worded in a way you would word it, then they may come to you to ask if it was you. Will you be able to say 'no' without blinking or blushing? – Jobiwan Nov 21 '14 at 16:42
  • This is a related question tor.stackexchange.com/questions/4552/sending-anonymous-email – Roya Nov 29 '14 at 9:33
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If you install Tor browser correctly, or use Tails, the likelihood that you employer will identify you by technical means is very small. Your IP address will be masked and will show in your employer's data-logs as being the IP of the Tor exit-node.

So the real question then becomes one of whether you will be identifiable on the basis of the content of what you write or the style in which you write it. No definite answer can be given but the following are potential problems that could make you identifiable:

  1. You have already identified yourself to your employer as being a person concerned about whatever material you write about in your "anonymous" letter.
  2. You have a distinctive style of writing, or you use particular phrases that can be associated with you. For example Ted Kaczynski was suspected by his brother, David, of having been the author of the Unabomber manifesto on the basis of unusual linguistic aspects (presumably in association with other things that David know about him). You reveal knowledge of something that only you, or a small group of individuals could have known about at the time of writing.

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