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Is there any way to limit the bandwidth used by Tor as a client? I use Tor as a client and I want to limit the bandwidth used by Tor without any additional application. Is that possible?

  • Tor or Tor Browser? – JSEvans Oct 30 '19 at 18:20
  • Given that a Tor client only uses whatever bandwidth you ask it to use by making requests, surely the best way to limit the bandwidth used by Tor would be to... stop using it? – womble Oct 30 '19 at 20:51
  • I guess with Tor-Browser I could use any extension. But it would be better if I can set a limit in torrc :) – BlackMatrix Oct 31 '19 at 20:37
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You can find this in the manual...

There are tons of different handlers against bandwidth, as client-node, the same as a relay-node...

e.g.

GENERAL OPTIONS
       BandwidthRate N bytes|KBytes|MBytes|GBytes|TBytes|KBits|MBits|GBits|TBits
           A token bucket limits the average incoming bandwidth usage on this node to the specified number of bytes per second, and the average outgoing bandwidth usage to that same value. If you want to run a relay in the public network, this needs to be at the very least 75 KBytes for a relay (that is, 600
           kbits) or 50 KBytes for a bridge (400 kbits) — but of course, more is better; we recommend at least 250 KBytes (2 mbits) if possible. (Default: 1 GByte)

           Note that this option, and other bandwidth-limiting options, apply to TCP data only: They do not count TCP headers or DNS traffic.

           With this option, and in other options that take arguments in bytes, KBytes, and so on, other formats are also supported. Notably, "KBytes" can also be written as "kilobytes" or "kb"; "MBytes" can be written as "megabytes" or "MB"; "kbits" can be written as "kilobits"; and so forth. Tor also accepts
           "byte" and "bit" in the singular. The prefixes "tera" and "T" are also recognized. If no units are given, we default to bytes. To avoid confusion, we recommend writing "bytes" or "bits" explicitly, since it’s easy to forget that "B" means bytes, not bits.

       BandwidthBurst N bytes|KBytes|MBytes|GBytes|TBytes|KBits|MBits|GBits|TBits
           Limit the maximum token bucket size (also known as the burst) to the given number of bytes in each direction. (Default: 1 GByte)

       MaxAdvertisedBandwidth N bytes|KBytes|MBytes|GBytes|TBytes|KBits|MBits|GBits|TBits
           If set, we will not advertise more than this amount of bandwidth for our BandwidthRate. Server operators who want to reduce the number of clients who ask to build circuits through them (since this is proportional to advertised bandwidth rate) can thus reduce the CPU demands on their server without
           impacting network performance.

       RelayBandwidthRate N bytes|KBytes|MBytes|GBytes|TBytes|KBits|MBits|GBits|TBits
           If not 0, a separate token bucket limits the average incoming bandwidth usage for _relayed traffic_ on this node to the specified number of bytes per second, and the average outgoing bandwidth usage to that same value. Relayed traffic currently is calculated to include answers to directory requests,
           but that may change in future versions. They do not include directory fetches by the relay (from authority or other relays), because that is considered "client" activity. (Default: 0)

       RelayBandwidthBurst N bytes|KBytes|MBytes|GBytes|TBytes|KBits|MBits|GBits|TBits
           If not 0, limit the maximum token bucket size (also known as the burst) for _relayed traffic_ to the given number of bytes in each direction. They do not include directory fetches by the relay (from authority or other relays), because that is considered "client" activity. (Default: 0)

Also, you could find much more exotic settings, such as

   AccountingMax N bytes|KBytes|MBytes|GBytes|TBytes|KBits|MBits|GBits|TBits
       Limits the max number of bytes sent and received within a set time period using a given calculation rule (see: AccountingStart, AccountingRule). Useful if you need to stay under a specific bandwidth. By default, the number used for calculation is the max of either the bytes sent or received. For
       example, with AccountingMax set to 1 GByte, a server could send 900 MBytes and receive 800 MBytes and continue running. It will only hibernate once one of the two reaches 1 GByte. This can be changed to use the sum of the both bytes received and sent by setting the AccountingRule option to "sum"
       (total bandwidth in/out). When the number of bytes remaining gets low, Tor will stop accepting new connections and circuits. When the number of bytes is exhausted, Tor will hibernate until some time in the next accounting period. To prevent all servers from waking at the same time, Tor will also
       wait until a random point in each period before waking up. If you have bandwidth cost issues, enabling hibernation is preferable to setting a low bandwidth, since it provides users with a collection of fast servers that are up some of the time, which is more useful than a set of slow servers that
       are always "available".

Just type # man torrc in your console. Thereafter, push the "slash" / BUTTON, and type "bandwidth", thereafter push "Enter" button.

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