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How to see how much data (in Mo for download/upload) was sent through my Tor usage? I know that tor.exe in windows says how much data was sent if the connection is re-established, but does it store it somewhere? And I don't know how to look up this in Linux (which I'm using right now).

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This is already a built in feature in the anonymizing relay monitor (Arm) which provides real time statistics for:

  1. bandwidth (upload/download), cpu and memory usage
  2. relay's current configuration
  3. logged events connection details (ip, hostname, fingerprint, and consensus data)
  4. ...etc

enter image description here

(Picture above for the case of a relay, but it also works for a client)

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It can be achieved via stem-using script. Tor itself makes some runtime data, but does not have a built-in extensive statistics module. You can regulary poll a Tor instance and collect data from running Tor instance and summarize it yourself

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The control port provides two bits of information traffic/read and traffic/written which can be queried by the GETINFO command.

This will provide the traffic read and written by the Tor daemon since it was last launched.

The stem library provides a simple interface to the control port illustrated in this example code to fetch these two values, from this tutorial:

from stem.control import Controller

with Controller.from_port(port = 9051) as controller:
  controller.authenticate()  # provide the password here if you set one

  bytes_read = controller.get_info("traffic/read")
  bytes_written = controller.get_info("traffic/written")

  print("My Tor relay has read %s bytes and written %s." % (bytes_read, bytes_written))

While it explicitly states relay, which is it's example use case, this also applies to clients. The above script assumes that Tor is running a control port on 9051/tcp on localhost.

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