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3

As mentioned in previous answer, Tor is based on Firefox, which by default trims URLs, and won't show the schema part on the URL bar if the site you're browsing to uses plain HTTP protocol. There's a (hidden) setting to disable that: Go to about:config (type that into the URL bar). Firefox (the Tor Browser) will warn you of being about to modify advanced ...


3

The Tor browser is based on Firefox, which since some time doesn't display the "http://" part of the URL you navigated to. This simply mirrors the fact that you don't need to type "http://" at the start of the URL in any modern browser, so it's not really helpful to display it. It will display "https://" if you go to SSL-enabled sites.


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A "page" and a "site" are different things. For example, Wikipedia is just one site, but it has 52,702,416 pages. If Torch has indexed two million hidden services, then it only requires an average of 500 pages per service to get the claimed billion pages.


1

proxies = { 'http': 'socks5h://127.0.0.1:9050', 'https': 'socks5h://127.0.0.1:9050' socks proxies are not the same as http/https proxies. You can't interchange the two. you will need to use a library that specifically uses socks proxies because they are not compatible. from wikipedia: SOCKS operates at a lower level than HTTP proxying: SOCKS ...


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Go to a search engine that searches onion services. You can find some here or here. Once you find a search engine that you want to use, right-click on the search bar and choose "add keyword for this search". This is the exact same as Firefox. See this guide for more information.


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I found that Tor exit nodes can't see the full path of a URL, only the domain (and subdomain if one is used). The full path including the referrer URL in this case is encrypted. See this answer on stackoverflow for more details.


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You could simply try searching for the address on a search engine that indexes .onions which should give you an idea of what the site is about. If that doesn't work: Since your concern seems to be about downloading illegal images, you might want to simply block images from loading while visiting that site. This can be done in Firefox's about:config by ...


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Here are your pyCURL and a howto UPDATE: Copy-pasting by request - copyright to code to sources mentioned upstrings: amnesia@amnesia: ~$ cat checkTor.py #!/usr/bin/env python import pycurl curl = pycurl.Curl() curl.setopt( pycurl.URL, 'https://check.torproject.org/' ) curl.setopt( pycurl.PROXY, '127.0.0.1' ) curl.setopt( pycurl.PROXYPORT, 9050 ) curl....


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The 'One More Step' page is from CloudFlare, a hosting provider. (See https://www.cloudflare.com/) The 404 indicates that the URL you visit points to something that doesn't exist. Now since the same URL works on 'normal' browsers, it is possible that the web site doesn't correctly handle when clients won't run scripts or accept 3rd party cookies.


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If you use a public domain name registrar, they may choose to route your web site to a third party, if for example, they are forced to do so by someone (under duress, court order, law enforcement request, or some less legitimate reason) With an .onion domain nobody can seize it, as there is no way to impersonate your private key. There is no registrar to ...


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The .onion domain url makes the connection encrypted end-to-end, but the .com domain is routed to\from a exit node, so it's the exit node that has the risk of abuse and so on. So - the onion domain is in a way more secure, but all in all it's considered safe either way.


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No. As there are 32^16 possible addresses, such a collision is astronomically unlikely. In any case, there's no way of knowing if someone else has the same hidden service, just happens to be offline; there's no way of knowing whether another entity with the same HS key is actually you (from a previous session, or another machine etc).


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