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33

As so often in anonymity, it boils down to a tradeoff between security and usability. JavaScript certainly doesn't have an excellent track record from a security point of view and disabling it will save you from a bunch of nasty attacks. But whether we like it or not, it's a crucial usability part of today's Internet. Disabling it in the Tor Browser Bundle ...


10

The Tor Browser Bundle ships with Javascript enabled because disabling Javascript disrupts the user experience and even usability of such a significant portion of the internet. That being said, you should disable Javascript unless you absolutely need it to access a specific site! See also the FAQ entry: Why is NoScript configured to allow JavaScript by ...


4

Tor Hidden Services are primarily designed to protect server operators and don't add any additional protections for the users (except perhaps the fact that if the server operator is using a hidden service it's less likely that someone can be squatting on an upstream router attempting to correlate your traffic). However, hidden services can still be ...


2

First it is important to keep in mind that a hidden service tries to keep the provider of the information anonymous. Hidden service hides the IP address of the web server, mail server etc. The hidden service host can do all nasty things which also a non-hidden-service-host can do. So hidden services provide neither more security nor less security. You are ...


1

Tor is a proxy overlay network and is not capable itself of downloading any files on behalf of the user besides the network files associated with the service itself running along with the distributed hash table information that is synced periodically for consensus on the network to allow the onion routing to actually take place. That being said, other ...


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