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8

Tor normally tends to prefer fast relays anyways, so I wouldn't worry about that. The following settings from the Tor Manual can speed things up a bit when tweaked: ExcludeSingleHopRelays 0|1 This option controls whether circuits built by Tor will include relays with the AllowSingleHopExits flag set to true. If ExcludeSingleHopRelays is set to 0, ...


7

As of today, the highest performing Tor node is pushing about 30 MB/s so if you are looking for tips, I'd suggest trying to match what the fastest Tor nodes are doing. Firstly, choose a good platform. Linux works well, as does FreeBSD. Avoid Windows; while it is possible to get good performance out of Windows it requires a very different programming style ...


4

Short answer is no. It is possible to do so, but would very much lower the anonymous nature of your traffic. It would be best to run A relay node 24/7 to increase the amount of "fast" circuits that you connect to.


3

Tor itself seems to pick reasonable circuits these days. There is no support for picking a certain set of nodes based on the properties you want, and if there was, it's unclear if that'd help.


3

External research performed December 2010 to January 2011 found that "The average ratio of HTTP request durations (Tor/direct) [from around the world] is 4.1." "Another observation is that the four nodes located in Germany, UK, and USA always have the fastest Tor connection compared to the other nodes.. more than 50% of all Tor nodes [were] located in these ...


2

Everything goes over a single connection and using fewer connections speeds up things This is possible, especially over a cellular network. Of your 5 theories, this is the best one. The exit node might have a DNS cache This is not it. A normal DNS lookup from your ISP or whatever DNS you use is at least as fast as through Tor. (There might be ...


2

The nature of Tor means that your speed will be reduced, your traffic will be routed through several computers before it reaches the internet. Either disable Tor, or find a VPN provider.


2

What I think was happening was that Tor prevented my IP from being tracked by my ISP and managed to limit my download speed. Generally Tor nodes are public, so it would be a matter of time before an ISP figure out you are using Tor and decide to speed limit that if they wish to do so. I download Tor to avoid government restrictions about a website, and ...


2

It could be that a firewall is giving you some troubles. It could also be that you're using the wrong config file (I only mention this because it happened to me once). Are you running an exit node or just a regular relay? If you're running a regular relay then a slow increase in bandwidth could just be part of the relay's natural lifecycle. If you're ...


2

It depends: https://gitweb.torproject.org/tor.git/tree/src/common/aes.c#n44 (Link has been removed, I've been unable to find it in the archive, maybe someone else will.) on if the OpenSSL it was built against supports it. As you're using OpenSSL 1.0.1 it should be in use, see torservers documentation. Actually directly confirming that OpenSSL is using ...


2

Your connection speed depends on the Tor relays involved in the current circuit. So your best bet is to click on the green onion in the Tor Browser. This will show you all three relays. Use Atlas to check the Advertised Bandwidth of those relays. Most probably your circuit will go through high bandwidth relays which results in such high speed and everything ...


2

With plenty of relays available on both sides of the Atlantic, you may find that a Tor circuit often forms picking relays on both sides, which adds to latency. If you see countries on the opposite side you're on repeatedly coming up in circuits, you could use ExcludeNodes to exclude relays from those countries. E.g., ExcludeNodes {US},{CA} or ...


1

Try getting a new circuit. The one you were on may be bad. Try restarting Tor browser to clean out your circuits However, you will see slower speeds because of the way the Tor network works: In short, you are routed through three 'relays': a guard (first hop), a middle relay, and an 'exit'(last hop). That itself will slow the connection down. On top of ...


1

It could have two different meanings when this happens: Tor uses another circuit to talk to the other side and this other circuit is faster than the one you used previously. If this is true, you could also have the effect that your download starts e.g. with 3 MB/s and resumes with 1 MB/s after you paused it and Tor switched the circuit (see this). ...


1

Some guy on #tor@oftc.net are saying that there is an attack (ddos) to some relay... is that true ? Not for all relays, at least (I operate one). There are around 6000-7000 relays, its unlikely any attacker would be able to siginificantly impact the entire Tor network at once. Beyond that, I've experienced no speed losses myself so even if one could, they'...


1

No. If it doesn't end up causing a higher error rate/connection issues it still wouldn't net you a noticeable change with your TOR connection rates or overall speed. The tool is made to make already poor connections act more stable and it's optimized to be used alongside tools like shadowstocks. Below is noted from past experience. Netspeeder caused ...


1

This is not what Tor is about. Going only through 1 IP is not secure at all. This IP could capture all of your in-coming and out-coming traffic easily. As with Tor, you traffic goes through 3 different servers. It's greatly saves your privacy. But if you don't care about your privacy, you could use any public proxy. I'm not going to tell you how to find ...


1

it's totally OK and it was a fast chain case: tor is not limiting the transfer speed in any way.


1

The article you're referencing is 5 years old. While the Tor network is still fairly slow, I believe it's come a long way since then. How do we define "slow"? Either by quantifying the speed, or by reference to something most people are more familiar with. Jobiwan's answer does the latter, using a comparison to an HTTPS connection. Qualifiers like "very" ...


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