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5

Ok, I figured this out. For some reason the custom onion address I made with Shallot was no longer working. I made a new hidden service and got rid of the existing one, restarted Tor, and voila! I'm not sure why this happened, but this solved both hidden services that had stopped working.


3

You need to add a server entry in your Nginx config file for each service. For example, with two hidden services your config file might look something like: server { listen 127.0.0.1:<port_hidden_service_1>; root /path/to/hidden_service_1/; index_1 index_1.html index_1.htm; server_name domain_1.onion; } server { listen 127.0....


3

I have set up gits in the past, and have used Tor to protect them. It works just as setting up any other service. Simply set up your server (ensure that there is not something that could expose your true IP address in it), and then forward the port to Tor. The only problem I have had in the past with this is the fact that it isn't easy to connect to Tor ...


3

What prevents a directory server from being dishonest and give malicious data to the user? The information served by the directories is generated by reaching a consensus between the authorities. You would have to control the majority of the authorities to manipulate the consensus. This should be fairly hard as they are neither under the control of one ...


3

You can easily fetch the consensus with... https://stem.torproject.org/api/descriptor/remote.html https://stem.torproject.org/tutorials/mirror_mirror_on_the_wall.html For an example of a script that compares a couple authorities see... https://stem.torproject.org/tutorials/examples/compare_flags.html That said, please don't hit the authorities every five ...


3

Near the top of this page: Consensus Health, in the Signatures section, you will find a 'consensus' (and 'vote') link for each Directory Authority. These link directly to http://ip.of.the.relay:dirport/tor/status-vote/current/consensus.


2

Should be fine. You're just affecting connections originating at your own machine. Whether it is safe to use drupal's autoupdater at all is something you have to ask yourself, of course.


2

The difference is because Tonga is a little special. Unlike the other directory authorities Tonga doesn't vote in the consensus (iirc it's the bridge authority). Take a peek at the following list... https://gitweb.torproject.org/stem.git/tree/stem/descriptor/remote.py#n674 Note that Tonga doesn't have a v3ident. Tonga is an authority, but doesn't vote so ...


2

Thanks for running a relay. (: Clients choose which relays to use based on their consensus weight. The consensus weight is assigned by the directory authorities after measuring the throughput for your relay. There are a number of things that can impact the speed at which your relay can be used, including the CPU speed, CPU architecture, the network ...


1

The main idea is that the onion service only makes outbound connections. Whenever it communicates with someone, the onion service creates a circuit to some relay and receives communication from the end of that circuit. This way the relay accepts new connections (through introduction and rendezvous points) and forwards information to the onion service through ...


1

for sure is it possible to run Tor headless also on an ARM server! (although i'm not sure if every ARM platform has precompiled packages...) for example here is a very detailed guide for the Raspberry Pi: https://learn.adafruit.com/onion-pi/overview or a script collection to made installing/handling easier: https://github.com/spiegelonline/sponionpi (partly ...


1

No. The Control Port is used to control and query the Tor client. Using Tor as a client and implementing the HTTP protocol is outside of the scope of what the Control Port and the Tor daemon aim to provide. If you wish to fetch HTTP content over Tor from the command line then there are common commandline utilities like curl, e.g. curl -x socks5h://127.0.0....


1

If your guard node is failing, you could try using a different guard node if you really really want to: How to change the entry node? But according to this answer, you shouldn't have to: Should I choose a new guard if the network is overloaded? There are security implications to changing your guard node: Why is a longer guard rotation period with fewer ...


1

The short answer "you can't", the description is: after sending a termination signal - it's wise to let the network find another chains, so that's why there's a delay in order, and there's absolutely nothing wrong with it. To reduce the delay - it does not works all the times - you can set via ControlPort "DisableNetwork 1" and give Tor 5-10 seconds, then ...


1

No, you cannot directly have an incoming clearnet IP. I.e. you cannot use the public clearnet IP of a Tor exit relay to anonymously host a server. Explanation on incoming connections / opening ports: https://www.whonix.org/wiki/Ports Indirectly works by using VPN with Remote Port Forwarding or pagekite. See: https://www.whonix.org/wiki/...


1

Yes, it's sad that it's not in the logs, but it is buried deep in the protocol mechanics. A brief guess is coming out of the EnforceDistinctSubnets directive description. To fix the case when you have just a single address use a VPN with unlimited traffic and static IP address like this - as far as I remember they used to provide a static address with ...


1

You cannot. Currently only EV certs that are valid for both some canonicle domain and an onion address are able to have TLS certificates issued but not an onion address alone, and not non-EV certificates. This is essentially a policy thing internal to the CA/Browser forum. From Ryan Sleevi's response to Alec Muffett asking the same question: "- At ...


1

"How did it get there" No idea. "what is it" It looks like a Tor network consensus document "why did it delete my PHP file" It's a plain text file, it couldn't have. "how do I prevent this from happening again?" Since no one has any idea how it happened, no one knows.


1

Tor Project: FAQ says: If you want to experiment locally with your own network, or you're cut off from the Internet and want to be able to mess with Tor still, then you may want to set up your own separate Tor network. To set up your own Tor network, you need to run your own authoritative directory servers, and your clients and relays must be ...


1

you must migrate your whole DataDirectory - the one you've specified in your torrc. after that you're pointing your new-hosted Tor to the same directory and config - and that's it! You can change a filesystem path of the dir, of course - just don't forget to reflect it in your torrc before running tor.


1

Tor can be used for several users at a time. Run Tor as daemon if you want, then you can proceed to run any network/internet software through Tor socks proxy: torsocks *software* For options about configuring and customizing the torsocks proxy, you can consult the torrc config file.


1

The votes themselves are also hosted at https://collector.torproject.org/archive/relay-descriptors/votes/ where they can be downloaded directly.


1

You have to setup an "endpoint" for that VM. No ports (except for remote management and RDP) from the public IP are open by default. Just forward the necessary port (most likely 443 TCP) from your public IP to the same port on your private IP.


1

From the Tor manual site: Add the following lines to your torrc: HiddenServiceDir /Library/Tor/var/lib/tor/hidden_service/ HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:8080 You're going to want to change the HiddenServiceDir line, so it points to an actual directory that is readable/writeable by the user that will be running Tor. The above line should work if ...


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