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There is no way short of the hypothetical attacks you mentioned to determine if a relay is excessively logging. Excessive logging is a criterion for considering a relay malicious but that doesn't mean that there's a way to verify that it is actually logging sensitive information. However, if a relay operator openly admits to logging data that they shouldn't, ...


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The Tor Project has a nice overview page of how onion services work: https://community.torproject.org/onion-services/overview/ Here is my own attempt at reading the specification Based upon the public key extracted from the .onion domain and a random value (that changes over time), math can be done to figure out which of the many thousands of nodes have a &...


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You're correct: Tor will detect the address change unless it's instructed to use a specific IP address in the torrc config. To speed up the address detection use a python script that will use Stem library for Tor and will check if your address has changed. And - when it changed - send SIGNAL NEWNYM to Tor control port and try to make an outgoing request, it ...


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Yes, it should detect that by itself. Important is, that you have the address line in your torrc blank. Then the daemon will check for itself.


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secret_id_key is an RSA key and ed25519_master_id_key is a Ed25519 key used for Hidden Services v3. Here is what the spec says about it: https://gitweb.torproject.org/torspec.git/tree/rend-spec-v3.txt#n127 0.1. Improvements over previous versions. Here is a list of improvements of this proposal over the legacy hidden services: Better crypto (replaced SHA1/...


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There are currently 6 relays running on macOS in the consensus, but I don't think it's an officially supported configuration. There are not many people who run Mac servers, so it probably isn't worth the extra effort to build and maintain a Mac-specific package. I don't think there would be any issues running tor though, just install tor (through homebrew, ...


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From the directory spec, the threshold is almost always 100 KB/s. A router is 'Fast' if it is active, and its bandwidth is either in the top 7/8ths for known active routers or at least 100KB/s. Yes the Tor path selection algorithm is weighted by relays' consensus weights and is described in the path spec document. The actual way that these numbers are ...


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Each relay only knows the two adjacent clients/servers on a circuit. So the guard sees the client and middle, but not the exit. The middle sees the guard and exit, but not the client. The exit sees the middle and the destination server. A single relay should never be able to link the client to the destination server. The tor software does not log connections ...


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Tor no longer provides 32-bit armhf versions of tor. You will either need to upgrade your OS to a 64-bit version, build tor from source, or check if Debian provides a compatible 32-bit armhf build. See: https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-talk/2020-May/045583.html


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As per changelog, Tor, starting with 0.4.6, no longer publishes any DirPort: Removed features (relay): Because DirPorts are only used on authorities, relays no longer advertise them. Similarly, self-testing for DirPorts has been disabled, since an unreachable DirPort is no reason for a relay not to advertise itself. (Configuring a DirPort will still work, ...


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