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4

Alright this was going to be a comment but no one has really addressed this and it's a pet peeve of mine, so... Generally speaking anti-virus protects you from known threats, they provide signature based, heuristic and now even sandboxed execution to try to uncover "malicious" behaviour in applications. These aren't difficult to bypass and infact ...


3

Assuming you download and burn Tails from a known virus-free computer, running Tails is much more secure that just adding an anti-virus software. Tails does not only protect against virus, software keyloggers and similar that may be present on the system OS installed on your computer, but Tails also prevent many possible information leaks Tor Browser cannot ...


3

That's a pretty broad question. It's possible that there could be a bug in Tor or one of the libraries which it uses that would allow someone to attack Tor relays and run malware on them. Under normal relay circumstances the harm done would be limited in impact due to restrictions on the Tor process. Running under a MAC like AppArmor as a low privileged ...


3

This so-called "Tor Proxy" is not affiliated with the Tor project, the the Tor Browser, nor the Tor network. It is just a malicious software that uses the name of a well-known product to deceive users into downloading it and then running it. To protect yourself against such threats, use you favourite anti-spyware. But the main precaution is to download Tor/...


2

It is possible that the malware has infected the computer's BIOS or other firmware and then any usage of that machine is compromised. If you boot from a CDROM with a burned copy of Tails, you should be safe from any malware that remains on the disk and/or is dependant on non-Linux operating systems.


2

Folks do care about this matter. This is the 31C3 talk that @user66466 refers to (33 minutes in). Or it is only necessary that the Tor network works in order to reach file sharing and torrent websites blocked by ISP company? I'm not sure what you're asking, but it is impossible to create an anonymizing network that identifies and filters the bad from the ...


2

You can safely disregard the message: All this message means is that the automatic updates feature of Tor Browser has been disabled. This is done intentionally in Tails to make sure that no security feature or configuration gets broken by automatic updates of Tor Browser. Source: Tails documentation


1

I'm pretty confident that there has never been an official Tor Browser version that has included malware, so I think this is just a badly written article (the rest of the article doesn't look very good either). As always, verify that the signature is correct after you download the browser to make sure you downloaded an unmodified, official version. It's also ...


1

The only possible way to avoid malicious exit nodes with a 100% certainty is by whitelisting the exit nodes you know for sure are not malicious (i.e. those that are under your control). The way to do that is by adding the following line in the torrc file as described in the manual: ExitNodes node1,node2,node3... Otherwise, the risks of using a malicious ...


1

@user But the exit node can block https, and unless HSTS is enabled, one will go to the "http" version (which is conveniently provided by the malicious exit node), and then again push a JS (or PNG/SVG/HTTP) exploit. I know that it's not safe to use http over tor for any private information (login, etc.), but here, the exit node can push a virus directly ...


1

Based on the information available so far, none at all. The Equation Group's known malware targets only Windows-based systems; there's some indication of MacOSX support, but no actual malware has been found.


1

Answering the subject question: different onions for different users (perfectly secreted from each other) is the technique for administrators to exclude any particular user simply by stop hosting specific hidden service. This is ideal "ban" in onion architecture, since banned user become powerless even in figuring out if service is still alive, forget about ...


1

It can be sounding funny, but the very name of the program describes it's quality - it's a malware bytes by itself :) But speaking seriously, after my experience in IT security, I can give you some advice in not using these so-called "anti-malware" crapware : Kaspersky Internet Security/Kaspersky Crystal and all the Kaspersky Labs crapstuff. It performs ...


1

yes, not just onto HDD, but even into BIOS and firmware - like Rackshasta. All software can have a zero-day exploits/vulnerabilities, including Tails. And it's OK - programs are written by people, people make mistakes, other people are finding these mistakes. Any OS and/or program can have this kind of risks, so don't blame Tails.


1

This isn't a bug in Tor, it's a feature. It doesn't reduce Tor users' security, but rather is evidence of it. If there were an update that "cured" it, it would make Tor less safe for you to use. Paul Syverson observed on tor-talk: Back in the ancient pre-Tor days, at the height of the crypto wars, Ian Goldberg asked me at Financial Crypto in 1998 why we ...


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