9

There's one important fact that makes such an attack extremely difficult. A connection between a Tor client and a Tor hidden service is actually composed of two entirely separate circuits that both connect to a rendezvous point. One circuit is set up by the client, the other by the server. Therefore, the client doesn't know which relays the data uses on ...


2

this kind of analysis is not possible, because even in a clearnet to make ping/latency be actually in a proportional relation with your location, you need also a very accurate data of the network load overall on the full path of the packet. These data a nearly-impossible to accure in clearnet, in any darknet it's technically impossible to get such a data. So ...


2

The Tor Check web page will tell you if you're using Tor or not. If you're using Tor, your browsing is anonymous and can't be traced back to you. Your ISP may well know you're using Tor - because they can tell that you're connecting to a Tor entry guard - but they won't know what you're using it to look at. The problem you're probably facing is that NBC ...


1

From the Tor General FAQ Can I control which nodes (or country) are used for entry/exit? Yes. You can set preferred entry and exit nodes as well as inform Tor which nodes you do not want to use. The following options can be added to your config file torrc or specified on the command line: EntryNodes $fingerprint,$fingerprint,... A list of ...


1

Same country does not mean same person. Have a look at the bubble graphs. Germany provides currently the most relays among them there are 645 guard nodes and 138 exit relays. So it quite likely that you select some relays from Germany. Tor looks for for relationships among relays and don't make connections when it assumes that two relays belong to the same ...


1

In tor browser, try going to https://www.ip-tracker.org/. This will verify weather tor is hiding your location or not. If the site does show your real location in tor browser than yes your tor is not working correctly. However if it shows an unknown location the tor is working correctly. The issue you are describing does not sound tor related; what's most ...


1

Riseup.net has a HS best practices guide which they use for their own hidden services. Can definitely recommend it. Check it out: https://riseup.net/en/security/network-security/tor/onionservices-best-practices


1

Okay, I finally managed to find an Exit that wallmart.ca didn't block. That post code is just the default. Purely co-incidence if it happens to match where you are actually located. The website has no idea of your real location.


1

Tor and Tor Browser hide your location from any website. The connections goes through three different relays and the website can only see the relay where your connection is exiting. However when you look at the bubble graphs sorted by country you'll find that a huge percentage of relays is in the USA, Romania, Netherlands and Germany. So if you're living in ...


1

ExitNodes {GB} StrictNodes 1 If StrictNodes is set to 1, Tor will treat the ExcludeNodes option as a requirement to follow for all the circuits you generate, even if doing so will break functionality for you. If StrictNodes is set to 0, Tor will still try to avoid nodes in the ExcludeNodes list, but it will err on the side of avoiding unexpected errors. ...


1

It will of course reduce your anonymity (potentially catastrophically) but if you don't require anonymity for the service itself then it is not a problem to use Tor for your normal day-to-day browsing. What you should do is always make use of the "New Identity" functionality of Tor Browser (located under the green onion menu) to ensure a clean break between ...


1

Let me first make a remark: you should avoid to roll you own crypto. :-) Instead of giving the encryption software, two people could physically exchange the keys used for the encryption. However, that would be very cumbersome, and we found a way to properly exchange these keys on an untrusted network. You can take a look at this question about how could ...


1

It gets your location from nearby wireless network names (ssid). The "How does it work" section on https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/geolocation/ explains it: How does it work? When you visit a location-aware website, Firefox will ask you if you want to share your location. If you consent, Firefox gathers information about nearby wireless ...


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