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6

To quote Roger Dingledine from many talks given about Tor: "To our knowledge there isn't a country/place where Tor has been declared illegal." (Not exactly his words throughout the years.) To my knowledge, which is more limited than the input the TorProject gets, this is still the case.


4

Obligatory disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer and this should not be considered legal advise. Tor usage may or may not be illegal depending on your jurisdiction. In the United States Tor is not illegal, and I have never heard of anyone actually being convicted (or even arrested) for crimes committed by others over their exit node (though there have been instances ...


3

The browser itself is a customised version of Mozilla Firefox Aurora, so the license in that case comes from Mozilla. Many of the components have their own licenses, but essentially you're looking at the GPL, various iterations of the BSD/MIT license, the OpenSSL license and some Tor specific stuff. There is more detail in the Tor FAQ and it doesn't count ...


3

I think the broader question concerns encryption in India in general, rather than Tor specifically. Looking at similar questions on other SE boards, the short answer seems to be: "it's not illegal to use encryption technologies, but if you're asked to decrypt your own data, and you refuse, you could get into trouble". The following threads help flesh out ...


2

Simple explanation could be - for the same reason that although it is not illegal to keep secrets, it becomes illegal if the secret endangers a person / place / nation. another example - courts are using facebook posts & punishing people who put up illegal posts but are not banning facebook itself (a search string, and read this ruling by a judge). TOR ...


2

Questions like this have come up before. The more general question would be whether encryption is illegal in Ukraine. The country does have its own set of regulations for the use of cryptography, which do also seem to apply to domestic use, as detailed on the Ukraine page of the cryptolaw.org site: 2. Domestic laws and regulations Production, trade ...


1

Only the Guard node would ever see your IP. The exit node would not see it and the middle node would not see it and the Guard node does not cache it in any way. Furthermore your connection changes every 10 minutes and most of the time each hop is in another country. The police would have to break Tor encryption multiple times through multiple servers in ...


1

You can best compare Tor with a postal service. It takes packages from one person and delivers it to another person. The address is printed on the outside of each package. The postal service does not open each package and looks what is inside. In fact in many countries such behaviour would be illegal. Tor does basically the same it takes packages and ...


1

No. If Tor made itself able to censor arbitrary websites because of objectionable content then it would open itself up to political pressure from governments to censor other content too. This would require major reengineering to reduce the security of Tor and would undermine it's own goals and ultimately make the Tor network untrustworthy. All such ...


1

Thanks for considering running a relay. Generally it's problem-free to act as a relay with a reject *:* exit policy. That said, there are some things you'd be best to check first. Local laws that might apply, even if you don't exit traffic there's a possibility that some kind of "anti-proxying" law covers it. (A lot of computer-related legislation is vague ...


1

TOR is not legal in Belarus, Ukraine's neighbor. Belarusian government maintains a list of blocked internet resources. All instruments that could allow users to access these resources are forbidden there.


1

This could perhaps be interpreted as a wider question on whether or not the use of encryption in general is legal in Brazil. If it is legal, then surely expecting ISPs, and by extension anyone running a Tor relay, to keep details on their users' IP addresses would be unrealistic. A good place to start would be http://www.cryptolaw.org/, and the entry for ...


1

Begin by politely asking for a written reason for the block, the process by which the decision to block was made (including the people or roles involved in making the decision) and the process for registering your dissatisfaction with the decision. That information should help you decide how to proceed. And perhaps you might edit your question to include ...


1

To start off with, if your only goal is to download and run Tor; you can download it at home and place it on a USB. If you want to get the Tor website unblocked, I would recommend speaking with the network administrator of your school about reasons why you believe it should be unblocked and maybe even convince him/her of unblocking it.


1

well, for example in China Tor is blocked! you can also call it censorship or banning... the only way to use Tor in China is over a Bridge! maybe there is no law against Tor because it is anyway nearly impossible (if the usage of Tor is done right) to locate/catch the persons who just use Tor; so they will start their investigation against critic persons at ...


1

Because Tor is project against mass surveillance activities carried out by various agencies which actually deprive us from our freedom. Agencies like EFF (electronic Frontier foundation ) protest against all the acts that go against such anonymity tool where all users have full freedom to say what they want. Moreover it is also used by many governments for ...


1

I recall that in years past, there were arrests of exit-node-operators in some places, e.g. Germany. The arrestee had to convince the legal authorities that the node operator was not the person whose traffic exited the node to the forbidden site. In the meantime, the node operator might have been sitting in jail. That's why there are a lot fewer exit nodes ...


1

I would'nt answer your question. I'll say my opinion: Any Radio jammer Any Tor node Any home brewed encryption They start watching you. One of the most famous forum for you to ask your question is www.pgpru.com. There are couple of jurists who could answer you more broadly.


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