3

In my opinion there is only one type of router that is secure, and that is a open source router that you can flash with firmware from source: TPE-NWIFIROUTER 2 Netgear WNR3500L Without it being open source there is no way to know what the router does or how secure it is.


2

It depends: https://gitweb.torproject.org/tor.git/tree/src/common/aes.c#n44 (Link has been removed, I've been unable to find it in the archive, maybe someone else will.) on if the OpenSSL it was built against supports it. As you're using OpenSSL 1.0.1 it should be in use, see torservers documentation. Actually directly confirming that OpenSSL is using ...


2

You can use the ExitNodes directive to restrict which exit nodes your client picks. From the Tor manual: ExitNodes node,node, ... A list of identity fingerprints, country codes, and address patterns of nodes to use as exit node [...] Fingerprints: ABCD1234CDEF5678ABCD1234CDEF5678ABCD1234 (so without spaces) Country Codes: {us}, {de}, {nl} Address ...


2

Really secure configuration would use 2 routers and 2 computers: main home router intermediate router, just for guarding outside traffic and not let anything except TOR traffic pass through - I suggest using MikroTik or Cisco devices, because they give user complete control, without any creators, simplifying anything etc. Tor router - normal computer with ...


2

PFSense is a full feature firewall/router that runs on various hardware. This gives you all the features of the firewall as well as low level control of the system if need be. Plus, you can easily scale the hardware based on your network's needs.


1

Restarting a relay will not cause it to lose it's Stable flag. Stable doesn't require 100% uptime, it requires that it be up most of the time, so restarting it to apply updates shouldn't cause it to lose it. From dir-spec.txt: "Stable" -- A router is 'Stable' if it is active, and either its Weighted MTBF is at least the median for known active ...


1

It takes a while for relays to be fully integrated into the network. The Tor Project has published an excellent blog post called The lifecycle of a new relay that has some more details on it.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible