Hot answers tagged

6

When you're logged in on Facebook, Google, ..., they also know who you are on other sites. Sites that have +1 or Like-buttons, sites that accept g+ or FB login for comment threads, etc.. From your question, it seems you don't want to hide your identity, just your IP/location. If so, this would not be an issue for you.


6

SMTP can perform well over a hidden service, in fact there are providers that offer such a thing. SMTP, IMAP and POP, the email protocols are TCP based and since Tor offers a base for TCP connections, every TCP based protocol can operate on top of it. Using SMTP over Tor could anonymize some valuable identity information in email's headers, but email headers ...


5

Johannes Berg experimented with configuring the Exim MTA to send mail to .onion addresses, and has written a whitepaper on the subject; see http://johannes.sipsolutions.net/Projects/exim-tor-hidden-mail.


5

You can run tor.exe without Tor browser in this way: 1) Copy torrc.defaults into the directory in which tor.exe is 2) Open cmd prompt windows 3) chdir to the directory where tor.exe is 4) Execute cmd line: tor.exe -f .\torrc.defaults You will see tor is running and Socks listening on port 9150, Control listening on port 9151.


4

You can do that, but you loose all anonymity if you login. This doesn't only according to facebook, this is according all sites you have to login. You can only be anonymous if you don't login in any site.


4

Pond Pond is not an email provider, but a new protocol to send messages. It runs over Tor and uses OTR to encrypt all messages. So Pond is not email. Pond is forward secure, asynchronous messaging for the discerning. Pond messages are asynchronous, but are not a record; they expire automatically a week after they are received. Pond seeks to prevent ...


4

You need to accept that all things flowing through an exit node are most likely analyzed by big brother government. Everything you send must keep your anonymity. If you are deploying sensitive information, you need to use encryption.


4

As long as what you are doing with your non-Tor applications and what you are doing in Tor is not related in anyway, it is safe. But if they are related, for example if you are starting a download in your non-Tor application, for which the link/torrent you found on Tor (e.g. using Tor Browser), your current Tor session is deanonymized (IP address exposed). ...


4

This is rather a non issue, I think. People typically use bridges when their Internet uplink (ISP, university, employer, etc.) blocks access to known entry guards. This may be part of national policy, as with China, Iran, etc. Savvy adversaries monitor public lists of bridge IPs, and so the Tor Project distributes them via email. This is not a perfect ...


4

While there are some great suggestions in the other answers in this thread, we should be careful to answer the question actually being asked. OP asked for anonymous email. Many of these answers assume he wants encrypted email as well, which may or may not be the case. As others have said, we need a better idea of the specifics of the poster's use case. ...


4

It depends, there are a few scenarios. Internal mail, from: alice@foo.onion to: bob@foo.onion or from: alice@foo.com to: bob@foo.com The email never leaves the foo.com server(s), there's no way to intercept it without compromising the mail server(s). Onion to onion, from: alice@foo.onion to: bob@bar.onion This is the same as internal except now either of ...


3

SigAint is an email provider located in the hidden services. http://sigaintevyh2rzvw.onion/


3

Yes, your privacy will be compromised. Please, don't ever rely on unencrypted protocols. This is also true when not using Tor. Your message will not be read. Also the E-Mail header (sender address, used mail software (usually containing version and operating system) etc.) might identify you, just like your style of writing. Your use case sounds like it isn'...


3

Posteo.de Posteo is a german mail provider. You can register via Tor anonymously. Posteo is free of ads and encrypts all internal communication. They want 1 € per month for their services. This can be paid in cash.


3

of course. but maybe at first facebook or gmail prevent logging in without identifying yourself for example if you want to login to Facebook it'd ask you some question (i.e identify your friends by their pictures or sending a SMS to you) to protect the account from possible malicious users. actually I personally go facebook via Tor and it works fine


3

Could you send an email from me@abcdefg.onion to you@hijklmnop.onion using standard mail programs and hidden services / transparent proxy? Yes it could, but it wouldn't be with a standard Tor. (Unless some extra software was put in the middle of some of the connections somewhere.) Right now Tor's transparent proxy's DNS server returns NOTIMPL for MX queries....


3

You can't do anything better because Tor is build for providing effective anonymity for everyone. When you are using Gmail with Tor, Google see a bunch of logins from different places. Thats why Google is suspicious of the location you are logging in from. Tor is slow because your traffic is bouncing through volunteers' computers in various parts of the ...


2

Yahoo Mail is actively disabling Tor users e-mail account. At first you might think Yahoo Mail is a good choice for Tor, since the signup always works flawlessly (unlike other e-mail providers), but after using you account a few times they block it. That is my repeated experience. See here for a list of alternatives.


2

safe mail is israelian, it is like that mosad offer you email or NSA. vfemail.net urssmail.org mailtor.net (mailtoralnhyol5v.onion) bitmessage.ch


2

Mail2Tor There is also this one (apparently Tor friendly and completely free). It works, but I have only used it occasionally. http://mail2tor2zyjdctd.onion/ You will get an @mail2tor.com address.


2

That depends on what your goal is. Browsing the web via Tor is a lot slower than browsing it normally. Also, there are websites which block access from Tor to avoid abuse. When you decide to use only Tor from now on, you will no longer be able to use these websites. Whether or not to completely abstain from browsing the web without Tor is a decision you ...


2

Those are lot of questions fired in one single post please ask some questions separately for you to get perfect answers. If I just stuff all these answers in a single paragraph then you will not read nor you will understand even if tried to due to complexity .(lack of rep forces me to keep this which should be there as a comment to your question) So my ...


2

I would say NO, and if you want to dedicate a computer to Tor browsing, use tails. Preserve the other browsers because: You still want to check other sites containing personal information without using the same session and over Tor. (Using Tor with major sites are annoying, i.e. unsolvable recaptchas, security of cookies, or just being totally blocked.) You ...


2

How about bitmessage? https://bitmessage.org If Tor gives a bitmessage address to request bridges like how it is done in email. Bitmessage is said to be encrypted P2P messaging protocol but it is still running in beta stage.


2

The technology is simply too complicated to boil it all down to one "reply that my mom would understand," unfortunately. There are some things you can do to significantly increase your level of anonymity, however. I believe the questions should be (1) anonymous from who exactly (identify threats), (2) what abilities do each of those particular observers ...


2

StartMail, https://www.startmail.com/ Cost: US$59.95 per year. StartMail never records and never saves your IP address. Your connection is via secure HTTPS encryption. StartMail has built-in PGP encryption. Yandex Mail, https://mail.yandex.com/ Cost: free. Your legal name, phone number, email address, and personal information not required to register an ...


2

Is it less or more safe to login to personal accounts (email, Amazon, etc.) when using Tor, compared to not using Tor? Generally speaking: Less safe. Don't do this. When using Tor, an exit operator can steal your account credentials if you log into a site without using a TLS connection. However, even if your browser does indicate that you're using HTTPS, ...


2

It is all the game of probability. There no definite answer to your question. It depends on lots of factors, but let us take one scenario out of the table. Read the below declaration first: Tor doesn't protect you from a global adversary A global passive adversary would be a person or an entity able to monitor at the same time the traffic between ...


2

Okay I'm taking this account briefly out of retirement because Croll's answer is wrong and massively misleading. Yes, they can (most likely) figure out that it was you, technologically at least. So the scenario is that you sent an email from some mail server to a group that only you and your classmates know about. Straight away you've acted within a small ...


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