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5

The difference between .onion URLs and normal URLs, is that the normal URL is simply a "human readable pointer" points to a network location... on the other hand, a .onion URL is actually the only address you should be accessing it from. The secure part about Tor is that it masks the server IPs as well. A government or "knowledgable individual" can tell ...


4

These are search engines that index .onion sites: Torch not Evil Candle ahmia.fi


4

No, correctly-configured Tor hidden services are not accessible by direct IP connection. When setting up a hidden service, you set up your web server to only listen to traffic from the local machine, which will come from the Tor client: You need to configure your web server so it doesn't give away any information about you, your computer, or your location....


3

The concern you're rising here is "will it be able to detect a clearnet address of a darknet server" - so it's must be protected by firewall. And the most effective technique here is to separate the service in a VM/LXC and make it not routed to the clearnet or run a service under a specific username and prohibit any clearnet activites for this username. It's ...


3

Your calculation is not fully correct. The hidden service address is encoded in Base32, which means there are 32 characters available. So there are 32^16=1.208925819614629174706176×10^24 addresses available. Even if you assume that someone has 10 billion machines and each machine needs a second for a test the whole experiment would need nearly four million ...


2

Answering in the context of the edit (accessing clearnet): Tor is better than I2P for accessing clearnet, because that is what it was originally designed for. Exit nodes are a fundamental part of the Tor architecture, whereas I2P was designed for in-net communication (there is no difference between a client and server at the network level). In I2P, we call "...


2

There are a lot of questions here. It's up to you to decide which you prefer. This is a Tor related stackexchange so even if "better" was quantifiable, it would be biased. Tor is not I2P, and vis versa. It looks like I2P has the difference in their design here. Good luck. TAILS did this for a while until a vulnerability in I2P was found that compromised ...


2

There is no association between the two in any form (etymological, architectural, etc). Both Tor and BitTorrent were created around the same time (early 2000s), but for entirely different purposes (peer-to-peer file sharing vs anonymous Internet connections) and using entirely different designs.


2

If no login/password is implemented in any form, then it is 100% scam.


2

These words have no technical meaning and aren't used by the people who actually build these systems, so they have no formal definitions. For example these words are not used by Tor or the research community. They are terms used mostly by the media and are usually used to project privacy tools in a negative way, or by people trying to make these privacy ...


2

7100 sounds about right for the number of hidden web services that are up at any given time. It actually sounds a bit high. The 30K from Tor metrics are the aggregate data from HSDirs. The fact that a hidden service is hosted/registered on the Tor network does not mean that it points to an actual live server. 'Scanning' all possible addresses is not the ...


2

It depends on what you mean by Dark Net. There are several TLDs used for different systems of anonymous internet access. Here are a few: .bit used by Zeronet .i2p used by the Invisible Internet Project .loki used by Loki .onion used by the Tor Project (included for completeness) Also, there are systems that don't use domains at all or, at least, not as we ...


2

Onion services can only use a single TLD (.onion). The Tor network is designed to use only one TLD and you would need to modify all Tor clients and servers if you wanted to support more. As the address space for onion addresses will never run out and addresses are not human-readable, there's no practical need for additional TLDs. Multiple TLDs for onion ...


2

Connections to clearnet sites have to go through exit relays. While it is wrong for them to do this and they'll get removed from the network when caught, exit relays are in a position to log and modify traffic (HTTPS mitigates this for the most part, but not entirely). Onion services do not use exits and are end-to-end encrypted. They don't need HTTPS for ...


1

A "page" and a "site" are different things. For example, Wikipedia is just one site, but it has 52,702,416 pages. If Torch has indexed two million hidden services, then it only requires an average of 500 pages per service to get the claimed billion pages.


1

First, let's establish the proper definitions of each term: The clearnet: the publicly available internet. This is the surface web, the part of the web that can be accessed by search engines. Darknet: A darknet is an overlay network within the Internet that can only be accessed with specific software, configurations, or authorization, usually using a unique ...


1

Neither of those links are to onion services. The first one (https://randomletters.onion.pet) is a MITM proxy which you can see from the .pet at the end. The second one (https://otherletters.com) is a site pretending to be an onion address which you can see by the .com at the end. So to answer your question, no DuckDuckGo is not indexing onion services.


1

In a private network you are all alone with your ISP, even if you use Tor. They know the connection coming to your home, they know when you connect to the Internet, they know when you switch to another network etc. In some countries ISPs are more powerful than you can imagine. For example, in Turkey ISPs are instantly sharing information with government ...


1

I think (maybe) it means they don't use standard Internet protocols to provide the same Internet services. For example, when you go to https://tor.stackexchange.com/, your browser sends a DNS request to your default DNS server, sends a TCP SYN packet (make a connection) to the address it resolves to, and sends a HTTP request over the connection. When you go ...


1

Using credit cards or PayPal accounts (stolen or not) weren't that private or anonymous and could be traced, so the majority of darknet shoppers didn't use them while purchasing products even before Bitcoin. There were other cryptocurrencies before Bitcoin that could have been used in darknet shopping. For example, as https://www.investopedia.com/tech/were-...


1

You are correct, packages are usually inspected and can technically be seized and the seller knows your name and home address. And there is no guarantee if the package will even arrive or if it will arrive with your product. Sometimes it can be hand delivered by the seller which is even more dangerous. There also isn't a guarantee if it's actually law ...


1

Short answer: Using the .onion links can only increase your security or do no harm (the security stay the same). Use them as much as possible. Long answer: It depends on what your threat model is. If it includes someone have already hacked your computer (or the website have some of your private data but may betray on you), then no the .onion sites are not ...


1

I prefer Bullmask search engine. Personally I'm using this tor search engine for tor2web. This site has a neat interface and those onion results are like google SERP. Also, you don't need tor browser for access tor hidden services.


1

I've checked the entered Onion both in TOR browser and Tor2Web service. Non of them, could load the address. Maybe the link is down which is normal in TOR network. Suggesting check in other time or contact the owner if you have access.


1

Check Orbot setting, could you able to see NOTICE: Bootstrapped 100%: Done if not you need to wait still it joins the Tor network. OrFox - check Tor connection by visiting https://check.torproject.org on your browser. you should see a message, "Congratulations. This browser is configured to use Tor. Then try accessing the website/onion sites. (make sure ...


1

Could they have made a scan of all the .onion websites in 3 hours? It is impossible in the way of brute-force attack. Because you can not check all possible variants of .onion's names. It is too many at the First and at the Second - Tor's bandwidth simply will do not give you a chance for this. You must remember, it is not an Internet, it is much-much ...


1

For experimental purposes I have installed torchat but wasn't satisfied, so I just ignored it, maybe I'll read something one day how to use it properly. Apparently torchat installs several other packages too. One of them was tor itself which launched at autostart and connected to the network. It's still questionable why it connects to "dark-it.net" but ...


1

Do you meant by onion search engine? There are some services like TORCH that serves to be Tor search engine. By the way, Onion is a hidden service, means no one can find it unless onion owner want to publish their address by putting it into Hidden Wiki or other sites.


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