Hot answers tagged

14

as the saying goes, anonymity likes company. so by installing ABP you're essentially sticking out of the TBB crowd more than a regular user, as your browser does not behave exactly like the others. see https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser/design/ 2.3 #5 Users are free to install these addons if they wish, but doing so is not recommended, as it ...


7

Don`t worry,Adblock Plus is an open-source extension ,you can see source code here :https://adblockplus.org/en/contribute-code If they dare to put a backdoor for collecting information,they will be reveled in a short time and no one will trust them,then their product will die. edited:A open-source software doesn`t mean it will never have any backdoor or ...


7

Update: Tails moved to uBlock Origin. tl;dr version: Tails uses uBlock Origin, if you use the same version, lists and config as Tails you can block most ads and keep a reasonable anonymity set, or you could just use Tails. Longer version: Ad-blocking is fingerprintable. Disabling javascript will not stop it being fingerprintable, an observer can still ...


6

The worst thing that can happen is that the add-on tries to access the internet and doesn't use Tor. --> that will destroy your anonymity and release your real IP address! Hopefully the worst thing will not happen, but what definitely happens is that you(r browser) will get more trackable with every additional add-on! Here are some tests to see how unique ...


5

A large majority of ads on today's web rely upon javascript. The Tor Browser Bundle currently includes NoScript which you can set to "Forbid Scripts Globally (advised)." You should see far fewer ads after changing this setting. If you trust TBB, I think it's justifiable to trust TBB's inclusion of NoScript as an addition that does not "phone home or collect ...


5

Because it is effectively permanently in "private browsing mode" anyway, so it doesn't keep persistent cookies or any other data except for things explicitly done by the user e.g. bookmarks. There's no cookies and no history in TBB. Those extensions add nothing if you're already in private mode.


3

As of https://superuser.com/questions/137931/can-websites-see-my-firefox-addons, there is no default API to detect addons, as there is for plugins. As stated, malicious addons can certainly decloak you, but normal, heavily-used addons should have received some vetting, so should be a bit more trustworthy. I have not examined the addons you listed, though.


2

Finally figured it out. I knew it was something simple I was missing! If you want an addon to function EXACTLY like it does outside of Tor Browser, you have to allow it in Private Browsing. I'd forgotten that TBB had Private Browsing on by default. To do this, simply add this line to your package.json file before compiling: "permissions": {"private-...


2

Generally all extensions are bad. If they affect how the browser behaves they are fingerprintable and therefor reduce your anonymity because your browser no longer acts like other peoples. Firstly, most of these addons work by blacklisting which is always insufficient and flawed. Infact a study of such addons found there were cases that it always missed and ...


2

Update: Tails no longer uses AdBlock Plus, it has moved to uBlock Origin. The information here is no longer valid. It's actually the one pulled from the debian repos, xul-ext-adblock-plus, as per config/chroot_local-hooks/10-tbb config/chroot_local-includes/etc/tor-browser/profile/preferences/0000tails.js sets some further preferences too: // Adblock Plus ...


2

Adblock is semi-safe on a non anonymous browser as they do allow "white listed" ads. But for purposes of using with Tor Browser: Adblock will block the image ads that NoScript can't. Adblock is a very common add-on so I wouldn't fear "fingerprinting". Besides, the more browsers that use Adblock the more we "look" the same. NoScript doesn't block image ads ...


1

As I realized, the sites does not allow scripts to be loaded. A suggestion: Use a normal browser which enables JavaScript with TOR. For example, while TOR Browser is running, start a FireFox and set SOCKS proxy in FireFox which does not have the TOR Browser restrictions. But if the site bans TOR IP (Such as what Google does), check out the integration of ...


1

First of all, you should NOT use any add-ons in Tor, except for those that are included it Tor Browser (such as NoScript, HTTPSEverywhere and other privacy related add-ons). This answer by user HoundCat explains it really well: Just keep in mind that whether you use plugins or addons, many of them perform background operations communicating with remote ...


1

This is most likely the cause of some Tor browser specific security/privacy reinforcements. Anyways, you shouldn't install additional addons in Tor browser since this can deanonymize you.


1

Adding addons is not advised for several reasons. Why not using what already exist in the TBB: NoScript and Security Settings. You can block many scripts from running with those tools.


1

Ok, so it seems that all I had to do was to temporarily tell NoScript to allow scripts globally. After doing that, I went to about:addons as per usual and changed my settings. Sure enough, my settings actually got saved. I.e., they worked for the rest of the session and also persisted to new Tor Browser processes. To verify that my settings saved, I checked ...


1

The sites you connect to can in fact determine if you're running GreaseMonkey and issue targeted attacks. In fact, a site can fingerprint which plugins you have installed making you vulnerable to uniquely identifying your browser across sessions. Installing GreaseMonkey has the same risks of installing any add-on but it's particularly a problem because of ...


1

Wouldn't use it for reasons in answer #1. As long as the javascript is disabled and settings in Tor Browser are kind of ok, there is no clever reason to use something extra. It will just make you look different.


1

You prevent IP leaks by using the tor browser bundle in its most paranoid security setting. Enabling plugins will expose you to deanonymouzation techniques. Enabling a firewall does not help. The reason the defaults are the way they are is for your safety. Do not change them unless you understand the consequences.


1

I wonder what OS you are using. I know that having a registry cleaner or guard active with Windows OS can restrict you registry from updating sometimes. Also I have had some issues between Zone Alarm and tor software which I fix by turning Zone Alarm off while downloading tor stuff so a non-native firewall (say - Zone Alarm as opposed to Windows Firewall) ...


1

It might be a good idea to just use the plain Tor Browser and not install future Add-ons. How visible an add-on is greatly depends on the add-on itself. If it blocks ads then one will be able to see that you don't load ads, if it "phones home" then the IP might be the one from Tor (or not), but it still might create some kind of ID that is unique to you. I'...


1

It seems that only the built-in add-ons page of Firefox has this problem. If one installs via https://addons.mozilla.org/ it works.


1

It seems that using a simple appearance add-on will not increase the uniqueness of your browser fingerprint (unless it weirdly modified any of the items below). No, moving those UI items shouldn't affect anything either. Items contributing to uniqueness (https://wiki.mozilla.org/Fingerprinting): plugins fonts user agent http accept screen resolution ...


1

Just keep in mind that whether you use plugins or addons, many of them perform background operations communicating with remote servers. Unless you know exactly where the traffic is going and coming from as well as the transport layer being used to transmit and receive the data associated with the plugin or addon, you can't be sure that what is passing to and ...


1

The latest version of TorBrowser is based on Firefox ESR version 31. Some of the addon features you are using in your code require perhaps a Firefox version higher than that. This can explain why the addon is working on Firefox Developer Edition and not on the older version present in TorBrowser. You will have to inspect your code and refer to Add-on SDK ...


1

Generally extentions and addons may have an undesirable consequences if added to Tor Browser. Sometimes the undesirable consequences are observable (at least it can be seen and thus, the user can decide to undo the extensions and/or addons if she desires to do so) and sometimes the undesirable consequences are not readily observable (in this case the user ...


1

You should not need to use any addons with Tor. If you want addons then Tor is not the browser for you. Personally I would never risk Tor's anonymity by using 3rd party addons. That's what Firefox is for. Not Tor


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