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At first glance this seems like it might be more complex than worrying about a computer. With a computer, a proxy like tor takes care of the ip and mac spoofing takes care of the rest. Android has more identification numbers such as serial numbers, ANDROID_ID's, ESN's and I'm assuming others. Does one need to worry about any other numbers besides IP and MAC being transmitted and potentially being used to identify them?

Furthermore, if one were to turn on airplane mode, activate orbot, ensure all data went directly through orbot, installed a softphone app, and coupled the softphone with some sort of virtual phone service, would this in theory allow for phone calls to be made without advertising identity and location to every cell tower in the area?

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Besides the traditional identifiers, mobile devices have extra ones. Here's the ones I could come up with

  • Baseband Identifiers: IMEI/MEID, IMSI/TMSI
  • Device Identifiers: Browser user agent, device model, serial number, screen resolution, ANDROID_ID
  • Network Identifiers: WiFi MAC, baseband MAC, IP, carrier
  • OS Identifiers: Capability/function disclosure, OS version disclosure
  • Tracking Software: Verizon Super Cookie, apps that send your PII in the clear, device debug/crash reports sent to third parties
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You said

if one were to turn on airplane mode

That alone should be sufficient to "disable all cellular services", making your phone a de-facto computer with a very small touchscreen and no other input devices.

Does one need to worry about any other numbers besides IP and MAC being transmitted and potentially being used to identify them?

If the device is

  • in airplane mode (otherwise, you have lost in so many ways, f.ex. gsm exploits, base station tracking, whatnot) and
  • running Orbot and
  • routing all traffic through it and
  • you have disabled google sync and other accounts and
  • used AppOps to limit application access rights to a minimum

Then it might be enough to not leak any identifiers, as GSM identifiers can be accessed externally whereas most other (except for WLAN MAC maybe) need to be sent from your phone by an application.

If you get VoIP running via Tor despite the lag, it would be interesting to hear about that.

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