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I want to run multiple onion services on one laptop . my questions are.. where is the optimal place to keep a separate directory for each onion service? how do i know which ports to use, which ports are available and ideal to use for multiple onion services ? and basically how to configure the torrc file for these needs

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Ports are available as per your localhost - try setting not 127.0.0.1/24 on your loopback interface - but like 127.0.0.1/16 - if you need more than 256 equal ports. After that just map your ports to localhost - or to remote "hosts" like real ones, docker containers and/or virtual machines. It's safe to have a folder like hs inside your Tor directory - and there's no big difference in distributing them across the file system because if the Tor host process is breached - then your hidden services' data can be leaked with equal difficulty. You can distribute them - if it fits your setup better - not a problem at all. To know which posts to map/use you need to examine your hidden service's workflow: what it will do? For example - for a web server use ports 80 and 443(https is a must for http2 acceleration), for SSH host you will choose a port 22 e.t.c.

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  • reddit.com/r/TOR/comments/12wr5iv/… Commented May 2, 2023 at 21:20
  • @wossoxunltd the answer at your link is wrong, read my answer ;)
    – Alexey Vesnin
    Commented May 3, 2023 at 20:19
  • can i ask one question at a time . ill start with what does ports available per local host mean ? =D Commented May 4, 2023 at 0:48
  • @wossoxunltd it means that you can conveniently host services on their standard ports using 127.0.0.2, 127.0.0.3, 127.0.0.X IP addresses, without a need to change ports to odd ones. For example: you have two websites, so both of them will use standard ports 80 and 443 on IP addresses 127.0.0.2 and 127.0.0.3 respectively. And after that you will just map these ports in your torrc
    – Alexey Vesnin
    Commented May 5, 2023 at 11:19

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