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Im fairly new to this so don't judge, but Im currently at a workplace on a windows 7 laptop and they've blocked almost every site, including proxies and what not, the way I downloaded tor was by connecting the computer to my phones hotspot. So after I downloaded tor ive tried putting in my ip and port. Im pretty sure the ip is correct, but when im in command prompt and type netstat -a it constantly goes on and on with different port numbers. Im not really sure what im doing wrong or how to find the correct port but can anyone help me out? What do I put in for the bridges, proxy type, ip, and port? Thanks.

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The ip Should Be:

127.0.0.1

and the port:

9050
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"What do I put in for the bridges, proxy type, ip, and port?"

Assuming you are configuring Tor Browser's Network Settings, you should only need to configure any of these settings if you can't connect to Tor without them due to your provider blocking the connections or requiring some local proxy to route out to the internet.

Bridges are only required if you cannot connect to Tor relays normally. If you can't connect without configuring them due to the connections being dropped or similar (check your logs) then first try the default bridges that are set in Tor Browser, preferrably using obfs4. If that doesn't work, try fetching some obfs4 birdges from BridgeDB. If these still don't work, meek should be what you try next. If meek doesn't work you're probably going to need to take some extra steps to connect, through perhaps creating some tunnel to an outside network that isn't blocked (ssh, for example) or some other bespoke solution.

For proxy type, IP, and port, these will depend on your local provider. As mentioned if you don't normally need to configure one, you won't need to set these at all.

If instead you're configuring another application to use the same connection provided by an already running and connected Tor Browser, then you should set the type to SOCKS5 or SOCKS4a, the IP to 127.0.0.1 and the port to 9150.

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