2 Additional info
source | link

By default stdout and stderr of a systemd unit are sent to syslog. On my machine(Kali distro) it is stored in /var/log/syslog. So to see tor unit output run

cat /var/log/syslog | grep tor -i

Edit

In case someone needs to monitor tor unit i found a better way. Adding -f or --follow flag to journalctl makes it to continuously print new entries as they are appended to the journal. You can then pipe it to a parser and react based on it.

In one of your termianl tabs run

sudo journalctl -f -u tor@default | grep bootstrapped -i

in another tab do

sudo systemctl restart tor

You will see the results are appended to the first terminal as they are appended to the systemd journal

By default stdout and stderr of a systemd unit are sent to syslog. On my machine(Kali distro) it is stored in /var/log/syslog. So to see tor unit output run

cat /var/log/syslog | grep tor -i

By default stdout and stderr of a systemd unit are sent to syslog. On my machine(Kali distro) it is stored in /var/log/syslog. So to see tor unit output run

cat /var/log/syslog | grep tor -i

Edit

In case someone needs to monitor tor unit i found a better way. Adding -f or --follow flag to journalctl makes it to continuously print new entries as they are appended to the journal. You can then pipe it to a parser and react based on it.

In one of your termianl tabs run

sudo journalctl -f -u tor@default | grep bootstrapped -i

in another tab do

sudo systemctl restart tor

You will see the results are appended to the first terminal as they are appended to the systemd journal

1
source | link

By default stdout and stderr of a systemd unit are sent to syslog. On my machine(Kali distro) it is stored in /var/log/syslog. So to see tor unit output run

cat /var/log/syslog | grep tor -i